Collect for the Third Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 8)

O Almighty God, who hast built thy Church upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief cornerstone: Grant us so to be joined together in unity of spirit by their doctrine, that we may be made an holy temple acceptable unto thee; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

This Week at the Advent, June 30 – July 6, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Lois Sharpless Pfatteicher.

The flowers at the screen and elsewhere in the church are given to the glory of God and in thanksgiving for the wedding of Kelsey McDermott & Zachary Kinsella.


9:00 Coffee Hour: Rob Braman & Rachel Johnson join with Betsy Ridge Madsen in hosting today. Next Sunday, Melissa Fox and Barbara Boles host. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com, if you’re interested or have questions.

v  11:15 Coffee Hour: Today’s hosts are Mike & Janell Sauer, with additional anonymous support. We are always in need of more volunteers. To view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Betsy James (ejames4@nc.rr.com).


THIS WEEK


TOMORROW is the registration deadline for SAINT MICHAEL’S CONFERENCE. This week-long educational conference for high school and college students is held in West Hartford, CT from July 28 to August 3. Please see Fr James, Betsy James, Rob Braman, Mark Dwyer, Gabriel Ellsworth, Sam James, or Harriet Lewis-Bowen if you are interested in attending or need more info.


TOMORROW, July 1, at 6 pm:

The full Advent Choir will sing EVENSONG WITH A SOLEMN PROCESSION in observance of the Feast of SS Peter and Paul. The Rt Rev’d Alan Gates, our Bishop, will preach. The choir will offer the Second Service of Kenneth Leighton, with Palestrina’s Tu es Petrus, and Quodcunque ligaveris by Byrd. Organ music will be by Franck and Dupré.

This is a special observance for the national conference of the Association of Anglican Musicians. Those who attended the Evensong which we offered in the summer of 2014 for the American Guild of Organists’ national convention will remember the raise-the-roof hymn-singing; and this Evensong, jam-packed with musicians, promises to be equally thrilling. So do attend if you are able as you will truly hear Bishop Gates “preach to the choir” at this festal gathering of church musicians.


ODDS & ENDS


The Parish Profile is now available. To read it, please visit the website and click on the “Rector Search” tab at the top of the main page.


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


A Note about the Parish Directory. Contact information for members and friends of the Advent is constantly changing, so copies of the latest version are available on request. If you would like one, just send a message to office@theadventboston.org and specify if you would like pick up a printed copy or prefer to have an electronic (pdf) version emailed to you.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


An occasional offering of little known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

In his Weekly Message of late June 1911, the Rev. William Harman van Allen (rector, 1902–1929 and seen below ca. 1913) included this cautionary note:

Once again, a word of warning about neglecting religious duties during the summer. All the Commandments of God, the Fourth included, hold all through the year; and we are as much bound in August as in Lent to be in the Lord’s House, at the Lord’s Service on the Lord’s Day. Do not choose for your vacation a place where there is no church, nor say, with the little girl, “Good-bye, God, we’re going into the country”! But in hot weather you are free to come to an early service, if you prefer, and then go into the country or down to the beach later, so long as you remember that Sunday is to be hallowed, wherever you are. Remember, too, to keep up your church pledges, even though out of town: the expenses of the Parish go on always. And, whether at home or traveling, pray daily for the blessed Advent, for its clergy, and for all your brethren of the Household of Faith, that we may walk worthy of our vocation and be kept from all things that may hurt us.

Father van Allen, circa 1913

Also – there is a new exhibit in the foyer display case focusing on our musical heritage. Stop by and take a look!


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
July 1-7, 2019

Monday, July 1
6:00 pm: Evensong & Solemn Procession

Tuesday, July 2
6:00 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, July 3
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, July 4
Church Office closed for Independence Day

Friday, July 5
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, July 6
10:00 am: Flower Guild

Sunday, July 7
The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
11:15 am: Solemn Mass

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Dr. Jeffrey A. Hanson at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, June 23, 2019, the Second Sunday after Pentecost

As some of you will know, I just returned from my first trip to Israel; I am glad to back among you, here in my church home.

While I did not travel to the Holy Land primarily for spiritual reasons but mostly for a conference to do with my full-time job in academia, you cannot help but be spiritually touched when you are in the land where our Lord lived his incarnate life. I learned a great deal as a result of being there, and I gained a new perspective on Scripture and our Savior to whom Scripture witnesses.

It’s a cliché to say that the Holy Land is home to the three great monotheisms: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The truth is the place shelters great variations and divisions within those faiths and more besides.

I spent, for example, three days in Haifa, where one of the primary sights to see is the Bahá’í Gardens. Not many people are familiar with the Bahá’í religion, but Haifa and nearby Acre are its holiest places. The Bahá’í faith took its present shape in 1844 under the leadership of a young Persian who developed a prophetic version of Shia Islam. He called himself the Báb or “Gate,” and he regarded it as his mission to foretell the last and greatest divine prophet, one who would stand in the line of Moses, Jesus, and Mohammed but surpass them all. For this heretical view that Mohammed would be superseded he was persecuted and eventually executed. His disciples persisted though, and one of them, who called himself the Bahá’u’lláh, “The Glory of God,” had a vision in prison in 1852 that he was that prophet foretold by the Báb. The Bahá’u’lláh wrote the sacred texts of the Bahá’í faith in a prison in Acre, only a few miles from Haifa, where the Báb’s body was taken and buried in a resplendent garden of 19 levels, one for the Báb himself and one for each of his original 18 followers. His burial place in that garden is a pilgrimage site for the world’s 7 million Bahá’í believers to this day.

Something else you will see a lot of around Israel are posters plastered up at bus stops and on light poles of a famous and important rabbi. Most visitors could be forgiven for not knowing who this rabbi is, but if a rabbi can be a rock star, this is him. The posters depict Menachem Mandel Schneerson, the last Lubavitcher rabbi who propelled the Chabad Hasidic movement to a global phenomenon. No one disputes that Rabbi Schneerson was a man of impressive learning, enormous personal charisma, and profound piety, but many say he was more. The posters stuck up all over Jerusalem in odd corners and hard-to-reach places are printed on a signature yellow that Rabbi Schneerson’s most enthusiastic followers have chosen as emblematic of their belief that Schneerson is not in fact an ordinary rabbi or even a rock star rabbi but is the long-awaited Messiah himself, and they have slogans in Hebrew declaring him to be so. Believers in the Rabbi as Messiah are routinely discredited by mainstream Judaism, but they are not few in number. Twenty years after his death, 50,000 people visited his grave in Queens, New York, and as I can attest, in Israel enthusiastic belief in his messianic status would appear widespread.

I bring these examples up because they tell us something important about the background of today’s Gospel reading. Jesus has been praying alone, as in Luke’s Gospel he often is, especially right before pivotal events in his ministry.

This is one such pivotal event.

He retires from private communion with God his Father and asks the disciples who the people say he is.

Some say John the Baptist, killed at the hand of King Herod but now returned from the dead.

Some say Elijah, who never actually died but was caught up into heaven by a chariot of fire and thus was widely believed to be bound to return to earth to prophesy the imminent coming of the Messiah.

Some say a prophet arisen to minister again after centuries without any prophet in Israel.

These were all popular ideas.

Even King Herod himself in the exact same chapter of Luke’s Gospel puzzles over the exact same possible explanations of who Jesus is. “Who is this about whom I hear such things?” he asks, and he’s baffled at the rumors he is hearing: about John the Baptist being raised from the dead when he had already beheaded John or about Elijah reappearing or about the arising of a prophet of old.

None of these answers, while popular, is true. This is why Jesus asks those to whom he has revealed himself most plainly, those in whose sight he has performed wondrous miracles, those who are nearer to him than any others:

“Who do you say I am?”

This is not an idle question. It wasn’t then, and it isn’t now. Thousands of religious leaders, mystics, persons of deep spiritual wisdom by their lives pose this same question. Who do you say I am? The Báb, “The Gate,” the foreteller of the last and greatest prophet, the Bahá’u’lláh, “The Glory of God,” the founder of a new religion, the last Lubavitcher Rabbi.

Peter speaks for Jesus’s disciples when he says you are the Christ of God. The anointed one, God’s Messiah.

This is the true answer. But getting the true answer is not good enough.

We know this because Jesus rushes right into a response of his own to Peter’s truthful declaration. Unlike in Mark and Matthew, where Jesus at least takes a moment to congratulate Peter for getting it right, here Jesus rushes into a sobering warning that the disciples should not tell anyone this truth and furthermore that as Messiah he must, he must, as if by divine imperative: suffer, be rejected by the religious authorities, be killed, and then be raised from the dead.

Why is Jesus in such a rush to make this terrible declaration, something he does for the first time in Luke’s Gospel at this pivotal moment?

I think it’s because he wants to be clear what it means to be the Messiah. We have already seen that there were plenty of popular beliefs about who Jesus could be, and these beliefs were entertained by everyone from the common folk to King Herod himself.

Jesus shushes his disciples about what his Messiahship means because nobody can imagine what kind of Messiah he is. For Luke, it is true that Jesus is the Messiah, but just because Peter and the disciples have figured that out doesn’t mean that they understand what it means for him to be the Messiah, and in fact no one at the time understood what it means.

I would say in fact that even today many do not understand what it means.

For Luke, the meaning of Jesus being the Messiah cannot be understood apart from the reality of his death on the cross and his resurrection from the dead.

This, incidentally, is the primary reason mainstream Jews will say that Rabbi Schneerson cannot be the Messiah. They look to no less an authority than Maimonides, the greatest Jewish thinker of the entire Middle Ages, for support. Maimonides said that the Messiah would be born into an unredeemed world, that he would restore the temple, and then gather all Israel together.

Therefore, according to the great Maimonides, anyone who died in an unredeemed world cannot be the Messiah. Rabbi Schneerson died in an unredeemed world, so he cannot be the Messiah.

By the same logic, Jesus cannot be the Messiah. But it’s worse than it even seems.

Because Jesus did not just die in an unredeemed world. He died at the hands of an unredeemed world.

He died for an unredeemed world.

This is the shocking, even scandalous truth of what it means for Jesus to be the Messiah.

And no sooner does he make it clear that this what being Messiah means, with the same haste he makes it clear what it means for us to affirm and accept him as Messiah. “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.” This is what it is to be one of Jesus’s disciples.

In Luke chapter 6, Jesus says something about being a disciple. “A disciple is not above his teacher, but every one when he is fully taught will be like his teacher.”

So if Jesus must die on the cross then so must we.

And yet notice something else unique to Luke’s version of this story. Unlike in Matthew and Mark Jesus does not just say his followers must take up their cross. In Luke, he says we must take up our cross “daily.”

The Christian life is not necessarily one of obvious imitation of Our Lord’s literal martyrdom. But it is a matter of dying daily to self.

Every crucified person was put to the pain and humiliation of carrying their own cross to the place of their final execution. This is a bit like being forced to dig your own grave. It is a terrifying reminder of your own imminent death and a degrading compulsion to participate in your own death. This is what we are told by our Lord it means to follow him.

Did you ever hear somebody refer to some minor problem in their life as “their cross to bear?” This is not what it means. Having a cross to bear is not a matter of putting up with a personal annoyance.

Bearing the cross is the way we follow the Lord Jesus Christ. Discipleship is a daily affair, a matter of day in and day out accepting the burden of living each day as if it were our last, putting our own beloved selves to death.

This sounds a bit grim, and maybe it is. But we lose our lives for his sake in order to save our lives. And remember what Jesus says about a disciple and his teacher. “Every one when he is fully taught will be like his teacher.”

By taking up the cross daily we are not just putting up with annoyances or building character. We are becoming like our teacher. We are becoming like Christ.

Because it is in the imitation of Christ that we get to know who Christ is, and it is in the imitation of Christ that we become like him.

He accompanies us in our suffering and trials, and it is in that dying to self that we come to know him for who he is.

The question remains: “Who do you say I am?” There is only one way to find out. We can say the true words: “You are the Christ of God.” But to know what it means we must walk in his way. We persevere under the burden of the cross because there under that weight we come to really know the one who carried it first—and carried it for us.

Amen.

This Week at the Advent, June 23-29, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Harold D. Walter.

The flowers in the crossing are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Robert M. & Alice B. Griffin.


PARISH PICNIC TODAY!

Please join us downstairs in the garden following the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses.

Coffee Hours resume next Sunday. If you would like to sign up to host the 9:00 (or have questions), please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com.

To host the 11:15 Coffee Hour, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. For questions, contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Kyle Pilares (kpilares.uk@gmail.com).


THIS WEEK


The Wednesday Bible Study will begin a study of the epistles of John, Jude, and the book of Revelation. All are invited and encouraged to join in at 10:00 am in the library.


COMING UP


On Monday, July 1, at 6 pm, the full Advent Choir will sing Evensong with a Solemn Procession in observance of the Feast of SS Peter and Paul. The Rt Rev’d Alan Gates, our Bishop, will preach. The choir will offer the Second Service of Kenneth Leighton, with Palestrina’s Tu es Petrus, and Quodcunque ligaveris by Byrd. Organ music will be by Franck and Dupré. This is a special observance for the national conference of the Association of Anglican Musicians. Those who attended the Evensong which we offered in the summer of 2014 for the American Guild of Organists’ national convention will remember the raise-the-roof hymn-singing; and this Evensong, jam-packed with musicians, promises to be equally thrilling. So do attend if you are able as you will truly hear Bishop Gates “preach to the choir” at this festal gathering of church musicians.


SAINT MICHAEL’S CONFERENCE: A Conference in the Anglican Tradition for Young Adults of All Christian Communions.

This educational conference for high school and college students is a week-long conference held in West Hartford, Connecticut from July 28 to August 3 this summer. We encourage every high school and college-aged student between the ages of fourteen and twenty-one to register and attend. Registration forms are available in the church or on the Conference’s website at www.saintmichaelsconference.com. Please see Father James, Betsy James, Rob Braman, Mark Dwyer, Gabriel Ellsworth, Sam James, or Harriet Lewis-Bowen if you are interested in attending. The registration deadline is July 1.


ODDS & ENDS


The Parish Profile is now available. To read it, please visit the website and click on the “Rector Search” tab at the top of the main page.


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


A Note about the Parish Directory. Contact information for members and friends of the Advent is constantly changing, so copies of the latest version are available on request. If you would like one, just send a message to office@theadventboston.org and specify if you would like pick up a printed copy or prefer to have an electronic (pdf) version emailed to you.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


An occasional offering of little known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

 

On June 18, 1911, the first Sunday after Trinity, the Advent held a Solemn High Eucharist to mark the upcoming coronation of George V. The rector, William Harman van Allen, wrote, “It is a joy this morning to unite ourselves with our brethren of the British Empire in their solemn national festival of the King’s Coronation. Republicans as we are, loving our own political institution, we recognize under the British flag the same ideals of freedom and order which our fathers cherished; and we are conscious of a spiritual and intellectual unity with all who speak the English tongue and guard the common traditions. Wherefore we do no dishonour to the Great Republic when we say from full hearts, ‘God save King George.’”


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
June 24-30, 2019

Monday, June 24
Nativity of St John the Baptist

Tuesday, June 25
6:00 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, June 26
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, June 27
6:15 pm: Vestry
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, June 28
Irenaeus of Lyon
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, June 29
St Peter & St Paul
10:00 am: Flower Guild
10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal
4:00 pm: Wedding

Sunday, June 30
The Third Sunday after Pentecost
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
11:15 am: Solemn Mass

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Jay C. James at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, June 16, 2019, Trinity Sunday

When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth; for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come.  He will glorify me, for he will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the father has is mine; therefore I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.

My favorite jobs are those that have a beginning, a middle, and an end.  I love work that has a clear point at which one can know that the job is over.  At that point the only thing left to do is step back and look at what you have done.  That’s where I get such satisfaction from a real sense of accomplishment. It does not matter if the job is menial or noble; whether it involves doing the laundry and the dishes or completing the draft of a novel, I suspect the same feelings of contentment and satisfaction are generated by both.  I think doing these kinds of jobs is so satisfying because the fruits of one’s labor are laid out very clearly for yourself and for everyone else to see.

I’m reminded of this when I hear the story of creation and learn about what God did on the seventh day.  I can picture Him sitting back and looking at what He had accomplished those first six days. The story goes: …and on the seventh day God ended His work which He had made.  And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it He had rested from all His work which God created and made.   Can’t you see Him stepping back and adoring all that He had done?  Of course this would mean that God had a certain pride and that cannot be.  It would also mean that he has a kind of self-satisfaction and if He is all in all then He does not have or need self-satisfaction.  Nevertheless, I can picture God just loving and adoring the Creation He began six days earlier and now sees its completion.

Here we are at Trinity Sunday and are in a position to simply acknowledge, worship, and glory in all that God is, and has done.  The Church year has provided us with this opportunity. From Advent until Pentecost, last Sunday, we live through all God has done for us out of love for us.  That is called justification. We waited for Him to come in Advent. He came to us at Christmas. God revealed who His Son is through Epiphany. We prepared to celebrate all He accomplished to save and heal this broken world through Holy Week and Easter.  He promised to send His Holy Spirit to be with us and ten days after His Ascension He kept His promise and sent His Holy Ghost on Pentecost and we are living under the guidance and grace of the Holy Ghost. That was last Sunday and now after all that glorious and good work, the Church has given us a Sunday, today, Trinity Sunday, to glory in His presence and unity as The Father, The Son, and The Holy Ghost.

This central doctrine, God as three in One and One in three, is about real life, it’s about faithfulness, and it’s about salvation.  It’s about real life because the Holy God is in us. It’s about faithfulness and that faithfulness is to Jesus Christ, the second Person of the Trinity.  It’s ultimately about salvation, the true and perfect end for mankind. Let’s take each one of these aspects of our lives in relation to the Trinity. First, real life:  

We baptized a beautiful baby last week at Pentecost.  At that baptism, and at all the baptisms we celebrate here, we know the Holy Ghost comes down to claim those souls, binds them to Christ, and these new Christians begin their lives bound to the Holy Trinity.  This means that the life of the Holy Trinity is not something that happens “out there somewhere in the life of God”. He lives in us and we live in him. I came across a quote in an article by the late Father Peter Toon of Regent College in Vancouver, Canada that describes this active life of the Trinity:  Baptized into Christ Jesus in the one Name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, confessing this one Name in the Apostles’, Nicene and Athanasian Creeds, and being blessed in church by this same Name, the baptized children of God worship the Father through the Incarnate Son and by the Holy Ghost.  Thus they are, as it were, enclosed by the Name; they inhabit the Name, and they are protected by the Name against the wiles and attacks of all spiritual and physical foes. The life of the Trinity is in us now, and we are in Him.  We are never ever alone. He is in us and we are in Him. What strength and comfort that is when we are going through times that are difficult and uncertain.  Wondering how to battle an illness that may lead to death. Needing the patience and strength to watch one of our loved ones suffer through heartache or loneliness, or if we are needing that strength and comfort for ourselves.  God is there in all His power to be with us. The is real life for us.

Life in and with the Trinity is about faithfulness to God and that means to God’s Word Written, the Bible, and God’s Word Incarnate, Jesus Christ.  It is this wonderful doctrine that keeps us faithful to Christ by keeping us faithful to the way He has revealed Himself to us in the Scriptures. We can make the Bible say anything we would like and many people do use passages to justify their own behavior and attitudes.  Faithfulness to the teaching of Christ and the Apostles is possible when Christians bring their knowledge and love of God the Holy Trinity to the Scriptures. This allows for the correct and faithful interpretation of the Scriptures. Just as Jesus sent out His apostles with the Scriptures, and the means by which the Scriptures need to be interpreted, so He sends us out.  Here is the Great Commission and when you listen to it, listen to Jesus giving the apostles the scriptures and giving them the knowledge of The Father, The Son and The Holy Ghost. This is the last teaching He gives to His apostles. Then opened (Jesus) their understanding, that they might understand the Scriptures, and said unto them, thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day:  and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. And ye are witnesses of these things. You can see now, why the Trinity is such an important teaching.  It shows us how God is known to us, and gives us the foundation of the faith we come to know in Holy Scripture.  That is how to be faithful.

Yes, real life.  Yes, faithfulness to Christ.  These are two reasons are enough to give honor and glory to the Trinity.  One more, salvation. Salvation is really the purpose and end of the Trinity. What is salvation, really, but perfect union with God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit?  If we are in a perfect union with God then we are saved from eternal death, and we are saved from our sins. What good things from which to be saved; our sins which so grievously hurt us and hurt others.

When we are saved in any of these three ways; by the atonement, by sanctification, or by glorification we are united to God.  When that unity is present, it is always a participation in the life of the Trinity. So this Trinity Sunday, and anytime we teach or believe the Trinity, we are really celebrating our salvation.  That is what the Christian religion is all about: the salvation of souls.

We know and can believe who Jesus is, and we can know Him as God wants us to know Him, because the Church has revealed Him as Trinity.  It is that Trinity that saves us and on this Trinity Sunday we should praise and give thanks, not only for God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit, but we should praise that same Trinity for the love that has come into our hearts and souls and brought us salvation.

We are left to adore God and thank Him for who He is.  Adore Him because He made you. Adore Him because He loves you enough to die for you.  Adore Him because even now He gives you new life and strength each second you are alive.  That is the Trinity for which we give praise and thanksgiving now, and worship and adoration for ever and ever.  

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Collect for Trinity Sunday

Almighty and everlasting God, who hast given unto us thy servants grace, by the confession of a true faith, to acknowledge the glory of the eternal Trinity, and in the power of thy Divine Majesty to worship the Unity: We beseech thee that thou wouldest keep us steadfast in this faith and worship, and bring us at last to see thee in thy one and eternal glory, O Father; who with the Son and the Holy Spirit livest and reignest, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

This Week at the Advent, June 16-22, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the high altar are given in praise of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity, and in loving memory of Vance Hosford.


We give praise and thanksgiving for the Baptism of Katherine Cherie Haynes. Katherine received the Sacrament of Baptism on June 5 and was made a child of God, a member of Christ’s Body, the Church, and an inheritor of the Kingdom of God.

We offer prayers of thanksgiving for those members of our parish who received the Sacrament of Confirmation or were received into this Communion yesterday morning at our Cathedral Church of Saint Paul. Those being confirmed were: Melissa Baldwin, Quin Cousineau, Christopher Doty, Maggie Eggert, Katherine Haynes, Carolina Stafford-Jones, Kat Meyers, Penelope Montaldi-Pulsone, Matthew Murphy, Nick Westberg, and Emily Zadig. Those being received were: Mark Aparece, Daniel Orsen, Brian Sirman, and Ellen Swendrowski-Evett.

“Almighty God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, from whom every family in heaven and earth is named, grant you to be strengthened with might by His Holy Spirit, that, Christ dwelling in your hearts by faith, you may be filled with all the fullness of God. Amen.”

Confirmands


9:00 Coffee Hour: Cassie & Jack Gurnon and Betsy Ridge Madsen host today. Next Sunday, Ray Porter joins Mary & Paul Roberts to host. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email bbolesster@gmail.com if you’re interested or have questions.

11:15 Coffee Hour: Today’s hosts are the Advent Choir. We are always in need of more volunteers. To view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/.  If you have any questions, please contact Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com), Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), or Kyle Pilares (kpilares.uk@gmail.com).


Monthly Sunday Evensong and Benediction is on break until October. See below for info about a special Evensong opportunity on July 1.


THIS WEEK


The Corpus Christi Mass, with Procession-Around-the-Neighborhood and Benediction, is this Thursday, June 20. The music is by Monteverdi, Mawby and Isaac, and a brass quartet will play for the procession. Fr. Welch will preach. We hope to see you here!


COMING UP


PICNIC! Next Sunday, June 23, we will have a summertime picnic in the Garden following the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses. The Advent will provide hot dogs with all the trimmings and drinks of various kinds. We ask members of the Parish to bring hors d’oeuvres, salads, desserts. Pray for good weather and feel free to dress appropriately.


On Monday, July 1, at 6 pm, the full Advent Choir will sing Evensong with a Solemn Procession in observance of the Feast of SS Peter and Paul. The Rt Rev’d Alan Gates, our Bishop, will preach. The choir will offer the Second Service of Kenneth Leighton, with Palestrina’s Tu es Petrus, and Quodcunque ligaveris by Byrd. Organ music will be by Franck and Dupré. This is a special observance for the national conference of the Association of Anglican Musicians. Those who attended the Evensong which we offered in the summer of 2014 for the American Guild of Organists’ national convention will remember the raise-the-roof hymn-singing; and this Evensong, jam-packed with musicians, promises to be equally thrilling. So do attend if you are able as you will truly hear Bishop Gates “preach to the choir” at this festal gathering of church musicians.


SAINT MICHAEL’S CONFERENCE: A Conference in the Anglican Tradition for Young Adults of All Christian Communions.

This educational conference for high school and college students is a week-long conference held in West Hartford, Connecticut from July 28 to August 3 this summer. We encourage every high school and college-aged student between the ages of fourteen and twenty-one to register and attend. Registration forms are available in the church or on the Conference’s website at www.saintmichaelsconference.com. Please see Father James, Betsy James, Rob Braman, Mark Dwyer, Gabriel Ellsworth, Sam James, or Harriet Lewis-Bowen if you are interested in attending. The registration deadline is July 1.


ODDS & ENDS


The Parish Profile is now available. To read it, please visit the website and click on the “Rector Search” tab at the top of the main page.


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


A Note about the Parish Directory. Contact information for members and friends of the Advent is constantly changing, so copies of the latest version are available on request. If you would like one, just send a message to office@theadventboston.org and specify if you would like pick up a printed copy or prefer to have an electronic (pdf) version emailed to you.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


An occasional offering of little known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

The term Anglo-Catholic, commonly used to describe the Church of the Advent and popularly used to denote the “smells and bells” style of worship, is said to have come into use circa 1830-1840. However, in the Advent’s earliest histories, the phrase is not used. The Reverend William Harman van Allen (rector, 1902-1929) regularly and emphatically identified the church as American Catholic. The description below, or a variation of it, appeared frequently in various printed materials.

“May I say something to our friends, especially among the students, who are just commencing to know the Advent, about our ideals? This church is free; i.e., it is the House of God, open freely to all God’s children, not parcelled out into rented or owned pews set apart for persons specially favored. (This does not mean, of course, that worshippers are denied the opportunity of paying their debt to God through regular offerings at all services and in the poor-boxes. It is Catholic: it derives its Priesthood, the Sacraments they minister and the doctrines they preach, from the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church, which our Lord founded upon the foundation of the Apostles and Prophets. But is it also American, and is subject to the American Episcopate, acknowledging no alien authority whatever in things spiritual. Its worship is according to Catholic tradition as received through the Church of England. No law of the Prayer-book is violated, and all laws of the Prayer-book are observed here. If you see anything unfamiliar, come to the clergy, who will gladly explain it to you.”


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
June 17-23, 2019

Monday, June 17

Tuesday, June 18
Bernard Mizeki
6:00 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, June 19
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, June 20
Corpus Christi
5:15 pm: Property Committee
6:30 pm: Solemn Mass & Procession & Benediction

Friday, June 21
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, June 22
Alban

Sunday, June 23
The Second Sunday after Pentecost
Parish Picnic after the 9 & 11:15 Masses
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
11:15 am: Solemn Mass