This Week at the Advent, October 27-November 2, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Charles Muller DeFerrier.


TODAY!


9:00 Coffee Hour: Betsy Ridge Madsen and Nola Sheffer host today. Next weeks hosts are Rob Braman & Rachel Johnson, and Megan & Michael Zadig. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com, if you’re interested or have questions.

11:15 Coffee Hour: Hosting this morning are Karen Chaney, Ellie Dixon, and Susan Fugliese. We are always in need of more volunteers; to view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Betsy James (ejames4@nc.rr.com).


Today’s Entr’acte, following the 9:00 Mass in the library: “Who Are We? What Are We Called? What Does It Matter?” Led by Fr Welch, this single-week session will explore what it means for the Advent to identity as Anglo-Catholic while being a part of the Episcopal Church.


THIS WEEK


The Advent 20s & 30s will be making a visit to Symphony Hall this Friday, Nov. 1, for a program of orchestral pieces presented as a part of Leipzig Week in Boston. Including works by Strauss, Haydn and Scriabin, the concert is at 6:00 pm and the group will return to the Advent for refreshments. For more information—including purchasing tickets—and to RSVP, contact Kyriell Paleologue (k.oldword@gmail.com).


Advent Coat Drive — Donations needed for One Warm Coat!

As in previous years, the Advent is holding a coat drive to help keep those in need warm this winter. This year, all collected coats will be donated to Boston Health Care for the Homeless. The drive will end on Friday, November 29. You can help by:

  • Donating Coats: Bring clean, functional coats (no broken zippers, ripped pockets, etc.) that will help keep people warm during the winter (think ski jackets, not dress-up jackets) to 30 Brimmer Street, Sundays 8 am-1 pm; Monday-Friday 9 am-3 pm. The collection bin is located in the library. Coats for children, women, and men all accepted.
  • Donating Dollars: Make checks payable to the Church of the Advent, but put “One Warm Coat” in the memo line and either drop in the collection plate or mail to One Warm Coat Drive, 30 Brimmer Street, Boston MA 02108.

If you have questions or would like to help out, please contact Chris Doty (christopher.doty@pm.me) or Harmony Witte (harmony.witte@gmail.com).


COMING UP


This year’s All Souls Solemn Requiem will be sung on Saturday, November 9, at 11:00 am in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Guild of All Souls, which the Advent is hosting this year.


Advent 175 Entr’acte Series: November 10-24. In honor of Advent 175, three upcoming Entr’acte sessions will focus on various aspects of the parish’s history. On November 10, David Russo will will profile John Sturgis, the architect of the Advent. On November 17, longtime parishioners Melissa Fox and Hal Langell will share little-known stories from earlier days in a conversation facilitated by Will Joyner. The series concludes with Tom Sopko and Deacon Noyes, who will present an up-close look at some of the Advent’s liturgical accoutrements, and detail some of the history behind them.


Anglo-Catholic Roots III: “Oxford Comes to Boston: 175 Years of Anglo-Catholicism in America” will take place December 5-6, 2019 at the Advent. Find more information and register here


ODDS & ENDS


Daylight Saving Time ends next Sunday, November 3. Remember to set your clocks back one hour.


Discount parking vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


Little-known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

In 1936, parish historian Ann Maria Mitchell mounted an exhibition of “Adventiana” that attracted hundreds of viewers over three days. Among the visitors were members of the Diocesan Library Committee, who remarked to Ann Maria that they “had not seen in the Diocese a church which had so many beautiful things, nor one where they were so sadly neglected.” Unfortunately this tradition of neglect continued for decades. The Advent 175 Conservation Fund was instituted to remediate and restore some of our most precious books, documents, artwork, and artifacts. The recent restorations of the cross and reredos in the All Saints chapel are “outward and visible signs” of some of what can be accomplished.

Less visible, but equally important, is the parish’s original Register, which covers the years 1844 to 1888. The oversize volume, found in very poor condition, contains nearly half a century’s worth of hand-written information — a list of communicants (941 of them), and details about baptisms, confirmations, marriages, and burials in the parish’s early years. Thanks to generous gifts from individual members of the Vestry, the book is in the hands of Louise Baptiste, a professional paper conservator, for restoration. She expects to have the work completed by the end of October. These images show Louise at work.


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
October 28-November 2, 2019

Monday, October 28
Saints Simon & Jude

Tuesday, October 29
James Hannington & Companions
6:00 pm: Community Supper
7:00 pm: Bellringing

Wednesday, October 30
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, October 31
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, November 1
All Saints Day
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, November 2
All Souls Day

10:00 am: Flower Guild
10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Sunday, November 3
Sunday in the Octave of All Saints
Daylight Saving Time Ends (set clocks BACK one hour)
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
10:15 am: Church School
11:15 am: Solemn Mass

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Dr Jeffrey A. Hanson at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, October 20, 2019, the Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost

A few weeks ago at the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels, we heard about a significant moment in the life of the patriarch Jacob, who had a vision of angels passing between heaven and earth.

Today we heard about another significant episode in Jacob’s life, one that changes him even more radically than his angelic vision. We know this because as a result of what happens to Jacob at the Jabbok river Jacob’s name is changed to Israel: one who struggles or wrestles with God. As we further know, a name in the Bible is not accidentally related to the person who bears it. A name tells us about that person’s character; their name is who they are.

And before now Jacob’s character has not been all that great. His birth name, Jacob, means “heel-tripper.” It’s a weird name. He gets that strange name from his mother because when he was born he was gripping his slightly older twin brother Esau by the heel as they both emerged from the womb.

The twins made their mother miserable during her pregnancy because they fought each other even in the womb, and then baby Jacob tripped up his brother Esau at the moment of his birth. And the years to come followed that same pattern.

Twice in their adult lives Jacob deceitfully robs his brother Esau of the blessing that rightly belonged to him by birthright. After the second time Esau vows to kill his brother, and Jacob has to flee for his life.

But Jacob is a clever man. A resourceful man. A man who lives by his wits. And when he is cheated by his relative Laban out of the wife that he loves he works all the harder and gets the best of the situation and a second wife to boot. Though he is gone from his home in the Promised Land for twenty years, he becomes very, very rich.

Jacob is someone who relies on his own abilities for his success. And he does well for himself, sometimes by means that are a little dubious. As his name suggests, he is good at tripping others up, and even when he’s tripped up by someone a little craftier than he is, he gets right back up and makes the best of it in the end.

So when God sends him back home Jacob’s craftiness is still at work. He knows Esau is likely to still be angry, so he does everything he can to appease him by sending ahead of him a big show of all his nice stuff: “Look brother, I’m rich. Maybe it’s not too late to share in the blessing after all.” But this time his flattery and cleverness don’t seem to work. It looks like Esau is mad and not only that mad but possibly preparing for battle. So Jacob strategizes yet again, dividing his own property to avoid total loss and sending his family on ahead into the Promised Land to what he hopes is safety.

And there he is left alone. No family. No wealth. No home. Just him.

There is a haunting, primal simplicity to the nocturnal scene that follows, one we lose in translation, because there are three Hebrew words here that structure this crucial event, all of which echo each other. There is the man: Jacob (Yah-a-kove). The place: Jabbok (Yah-boke). And there is an action: wrestle (Ha-vahk).

The man is who has always been. Jacob, entirely self-reliant from birth, always looking out for himself. Jacob stands alone in the dark with nothing but his own considerable strength and smarts to help him.

The place is important too, because the Jabbok river ford is a tributary to the Jordan. We are just on the edge of the Land promised to Moses and his descendants. Jacob at the Jabbok is on the threshold of home.

But the action is totally unexpected. It is dark, Jacob is alone, and all of sudden he is set upon by an entirely mysterious someone.

Just when it seems like Jacob will win for himself yet another victory, that he will beat this challenge too…the one he is wrestling strikes the blow that will incapacitate him.

He’s lost. Yet even now he looks out for a way he can benefit himself. Jacob is still looking for that advantage. Though his thigh is out of joint he clings to his opponent and insists that he bless him. The man who twice stole his own brother’s blessing has the audacity to demand just such a blessing from someone he now grudgingly has to admit has got the best of him.

But he also has to admit who he is. He has to give his name and therefore to admit his character.

Once he does, he gets a new name and a new character. From now on he shall known as Israel, the one who contends with God.

Yet when Jacob presses his opponent for his name, he is elusive. Rather than bless his opponent in return Jacob blesses the place, thus changing not just his own name but also the name of the place where he stands, and he calls it the face of God. “For I have seen God face to face, and yet my life is preserved.”

It’s a commonplace in both the New and Old Testaments that we cannot see God as God is without being utterly annihilated by the experience. It is a grace and a mercy when God shows us God’s own self in some indirect way, as it seems God did to Jacob. This conclusion is further supported by the fact that Jacob’s opponent declines to give his own name, because just as God does not show his face, so also his name is elusive. And that is because God’s nature is elusive.

So this tale abounds in mystery. To choose just one of many questions we could ask, Why does God stand between Jacob and his return to the Promised Land, a return that God himself has urged upon Jacob?

Here is my guess: This moment is nothing less than the birth of a people, the people of God’s own choosing. And God chooses those who wrestle with him and chooses them to wrestle with him.

Jacob cannot enter into the Promised Land, he cannot come back home, on his own strength and smarts.

He must be changed. And that change is one he cannot make in his own life. The calling of Jacob to be Israel is one that God initiates. No amount of struggle can force God to bless Jacob and call him into a new and restored life in the land of promise.

Yet at the same time the path to the Promised Land is a path of struggle. We need to know that our own strength is not sufficient to get us home. Yet at the same time we are expected to use our strength to struggle with God, a struggle that is also mysteriously service to God.

The virtue that helps us to sustain struggle is an important one we don’t hear about often enough: That virtue is perseverance. We prayed for it this morning, in the collect for the day. We prayed for perseverance in faith.

And that’s because perseverance is a product of faith in the promise of God. To believe in God, to believe in the promises of God, is go on wrestling, because we believe that it is God who would have us wrestle and yes, even to wrestle with him. God wrestles Jacob on the very border of the Promised Land, but it’s God who sent him home in the first place.

Because no good thing comes without struggle. The good is hard-won.

Perseverance is what allows us to endure until victory. Jacob becomes Israel because he has struggled with God and God says he has prevailed. So what looks like a loss for Jacob is actually a victory. The defeat of his own strength is his real victory.

But that victory that perseverance wins itself come from God. Because while we go on wrestling with God it is not that wrestling that gives us the victory.

Perseverance makes us strong, but it does so with a strength that is not our own. The victory is to be had precisely when we no longer insist on our own strength. We have to not even insist on being our own old selves.

Jacob gets a new name because when you struggle with God, in the end God overwhelms you. God overwhelms you and makes you someone new. God puts Jacob’s thigh out of joint because it’s about time Jacob got tripped up. And God leaves the mark of that injury, as Jacob limps into the Promised Land, as a reminder of the new person he must be, as a physical reminder of his spiritual struggle.

Perseverance is the grace that comes from having struggled with someone other than you; it is how we stop insisting on being ourselves. And because of that it is also a way to be at peace with others. As Saint Paul reminds us, in one of his most celebrated passages, love endureth all things. Love perseveres. And because it perseveres love can bear with others, with their indifference, with their incomprehension, even with their lust for vengeance.

And that’s really where this story ends. With love. Jacob, now Israel, the one who struggled with God, limps into the Promised Land that to this day bears his name. And when his brother Esau approaches, he bows down to that sacred ground, he bows down on his bad leg, lamed and finally humbled.

And then what?: Genesis 33: “Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept.”

That’s why we pray for perseverance. Because the good is always hard-won. It is always difficult. And it also takes time. Because to struggle with God and to contend for his blessing must be done on his timetable, not our own. Jacob has been gone for twenty years. And even on the very threshold of home he still has to fight for it. All night long.

But he wins. He wins peace and joy and reconciliation.

The struggle itself comes from God. And so does the victory. And so does the final blessing. For at the end of all our struggles, it’s the lame that shall enter first, and the ones who were wounded by their contention with God will show the rest of us how to replace vengeance with an embrace.

Amen.

This Week at the Advent, October 20-26, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Svend and Helga Norregaard.


TODAY!


9:00 Coffee Hour: Hosts this morning are Judy Bell & Fran Piscitelli with Melissa Fox. Next week’s hosts are Betsy Ridge Madsen and Nola Sheffer. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com, if you’re interested or have questions.

11:15 Coffee Hour: Hosting this morning are Roxy Hanson and Mike & Janelle Saur. We are always in need of more volunteers; to view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Betsy James (ejames4@nc.rr.com).


Entr’acte Series: Christ and Culture Today concludes today. Frs. Welch and Hanson, along with Advent parishioner and PhD candidate in philosophy Nicholas Westberg, discuss and debate Richard Niebuhr’s classic work, Christ and Culture, as well as the issues that the text still raises for us today.


Advent Tour: This morning our Verger, Raymond Porter, will give a 10–15 minute tour of the church building following the 11:15 Mass. Meet him in the Baptistry immediately following the Postlude and learn about our fascinating, complicated, historic building.


Solemn Evensong and Benediction. There will be an organ recital by Mitchell Crawford today at 4:30 pm, followed at 5:00 by a service of Solemn Evensong and Benediction. Music will include works by Radcliffe, Walton, Mundy, and Purcell. Following this one-hour service, a light supper will be offered at 6:00 pm and we begin a series of talks focusing on our Anglo-Catholic heritage in conjunction with the Advent 175 celebration. This first talk will be “Manton Eastburn: Man of Sorrows” by Deacon Noyes.


Advent Coat Drive — Donations needed for One Warm Coat!

As in previous years, the Advent is holding a coat drive this October and November to help keep those in need warm this winter. This year, all collected coats will be donated to Boston Health Care for the Homeless. The drive will run until Friday, November 29. You can help by:

  • Donating Coats: Bring clean, functional coats (no broken zippers, ripped pockets, etc.) that will help keep people warm during the winter (think ski jackets, not dress-up jackets) to 30 Brimmer Street, Sundays 8 am-1 pm; Monday-Friday 9 am-3 pm. The collection bin is located in the library. Coats for children, women, and men all accepted.
  • Donating Dollars: Make checks payable to the Church of the Advent, but put “One Warm Coat” in the memo line and either drop in the collection plate or mail to One Warm Coat Drive, 30 Brimmer Street, Boston MA 02108.

If you have questions or would like to help out, please contact Chris Doty (christopher.doty@pm.me) or Harmony Witte (harmony.witte@gmail.com).


THIS WEEK


Two of our faithful parishioners will be received into The Episcopal Church this Saturday, October 26 at 10:30 am at The Cathedral Church of Saint Paul. Ellen Swendrowski-Evett and Ginny McMackin will be presented by Father Welch so they can receive the laying-on-of-hands by the Bishop and be welcomed into the full communion of The Episcopal Church. Please keep them in your prayers as they prepare for the deanery-wide celebration and know that you are welcomed and encouraged to support them by your presence.


COMING UP


Entr’acte for next Sunday, Oct 27:Who Are We? What Are We Called? What Does It Matter?” Led by Fr Welch.

“I’ve encountered some confusion since I’ve been at the Advent about our identity as a parish. If we call ourselves Anglo-Catholic, then does that mean we aren’t part of the Episcopal Church? And if we are Episcopalian, who has authority over us? And if we are Anglo-Catholic, what does that really signify? Do Anglo-Catholics all share the same theology and ecclesiology? The same liturgical preferences? Identical ideas about women in Holy Orders? There won’t be time in one session to cover all these questions, but I’ll try my best.”  — Fr. Welch


ODDS & ENDS


The flowers that adorn the Church are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish. There is opening for flower memorials or thanksgivings on Sunday, November 17. If you are interested, please contact the parish administrator (office@theadventboston.org).

Floral arrangements at the Advent have been provided by devoted volunteers in the parish Flower Arranging Guild since 1992, providing all of the arrangements in the church. In addition to an enthusiastic, eclectic team of dedicated amateur designers working under the direction of Tom Sopko, drivers who pick up the flowers at the wholesale market and bring them to the church and helpers who unpack and process the material are essential to the functioning of the flower ministry. Several designers and drivers have moved away in the last year, so the Guild is seeking volunteers for these and other tasks. For more information on what is involved, look for a brochure at the back of the church or talk to any of the following Guild members: Tom Sopko, Betsy James, Cassie Gurnon, or Betsy Madsen.


Music Notes: Live recordings of the Advent Choir’s most recent work may always be found at https://soundcloud.com/mark-dwyer-2/tracks. Likewise, repertoire lists are available at https://www.theadventboston.org/1115-music-schedule/, or in the choral music brochures, found in the rear of the church.


Birthday Wish List: As the 175th birthday of the Advent rapidly approaches, we are grateful to all who have given or pledged to the Birthday Wish List. Collectively, they have funded:

  • Restoration of the original Parish Register (1844)
  • Restoration of the original Certificate of Consecration (1894)
  • Framing of the Certificate of Consecration
  • Restoration of the Easter Collect calligraphy (1922)
  • Framing of three watercolors by Robert Turner Walker (1920s)
  • Re-gilding of the original cross in All Saints Chapel (1840)

Our thanks to John Dooley, David Lapin, Daphne B. Noyes, Julianne Ture, Francesco Piscatelli and Judy Bell, and individual members of the Vestry for their combined gift. Additional thanks to all who have supported our Advent 175 commemorative items — and please see the fresh new stock, including postcards, bookmarks, and aprons. Notecards and porcelain ornaments are coming soon.

For those interested in helping support Advent 175 conservation efforts, please consider making a gift towards conservation and restoration of our critically important parish record books, especially those from the 1800s. All gifts — large, small, in-between — help us achieve our goal of preserving these important pieces of the Advent’s past.

— Maria Denslow and Thatcher Gearhart, Co-chairs, Advent 175 Committee

And Speaking of Advent 175:

  • New merchandise: A limited number of votives handcrafted from remnants of candles used at the Church of the Advent are now available. Each votive includes some wax from a Paschal Candle. Suggested donation, to benefit the Conservation Fund, is $2 each.
  • Entr’acte series: November 10, 17, 24. More info to come.

FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


Little-known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

With phase one of the re-gilding of the All Saints cross and reredos completed, what better time to explore some of the history of the conflict that marked the parish’s earliest years.

Immediately after his first episcopal visitation to the Church of the Advent, then located in an “upper room” in a building on the corner of Lowell and Causeway Streets, Bishop Manton Eastburn issued a pastoral letter which was published in The Christian Witness of December 5, 1845. He wrote:

Manton Eastburn

“On Nov. 23, I visited the ch. of the Advent, for confirmation, and there observed, to my inexpressible grief and pain, various offensive innovations upon the ancient usage of our Church. In the form of the Communion Table; in the decorations of golden candlesticks, and of a large wooden cross, by which it is surmounted… I perceived with sorrow superstitious puerilities…Were these novelties nothing but childish, they would on that account be sufficiently objectionable to call forth my censure…but chiefly do I consider these innovations…because of their pointed and offensive resemblance to the usages of that Idolatrous Papal Communion against which our own Prayer Book so strongly protests.”

Thus began an exchange of letters between Bishop Eastburn and William Croswell, rector of the Church of the Advent, until Croswell’s death in 1851. The exchange continued with the Advent’s second rector, Horatio Southgate; the collection would eventually be published in a booklet of 123 pages.

In Trinity Church in the City of Boston, 17331833, Bishop William Lawrence said of Eastburn’s letters, “Such missives did not make for peace, and some of his closest friends, both clergy and lay, urged him to desist; but his sense of duty was clear and strong.”

It is interesting that despite the cross’s significance and history, neither its donor (if there was one) nor its maker is mentioned in any of the parish histories.


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
October 14-20, 2019

Monday, October 21

Tuesday, October 22
6:00 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, October 23
St James of Jerusalem
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, October 24
6:15 pm: Vestry
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, October 25
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, October 26
Alfred the Great

10:00 am: Flower Guild
10:30 am: Confirmation (at The Cathedral Church of St Paul)

Sunday, October 27
Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
10:15 am: Church School / Entr’acte
11:15 am: Solemn Mass

This Week at the Advent, October 13-19, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in thanksgiving for Advent intercessory prayers answered for Stephen Goranson.


TODAY!


9:00 Coffee Hour: Hosts this morning are Bette Boughton and Jonnet Holladay. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com, if you’re interested or have questions.

11:15 Coffee Hour: Hosting this morning are David Fisher, David Lapin, and Frank Olney. We are always in need of more volunteers; to view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Betsy James (ejames4@nc.rr.com).


Entr’acte Series: Christ and Culture Today continues today. Frs. Welch and Hanson, along with Advent parishioner and PhD candidate in philosophy Nicholas Westberg, discuss and debate Richard Niebuhr’s classic work, Christ and Culture, as well as the issues that the text still raises for us today. These Entr’acte presentations are intended to be a conversation between the three leaders but with ample opportunities for others to join in. It should be fun and illuminating, so please join us. Copies of Christ and Culture are available in the Advent Bookstore; it is not required reading for these sessions, but some might find it helpful.


Compline at the Advent at 8:00 pm. Join us for the ancient liturgy of Compline, preceded by Lucernarium, an evening service of lamp-lighting. We pray Compline, the service of prayer before bedtime in the custom of early Christian monasticism, on the second Sunday of every month at 8:00 pm in the nave.


COMING UP


Evensong Resumes! Next Sunday, October 20, there will be an organ recital at 4:30 pm by Mitchell Crawford, followed at 5:00 by a service of Solemn Evensong and Benediction. Music will include works by Radcliffe, Walton, Mundy, and Purcell. Following this one-hour service, a light supper will be offered at 6:00 pm and we begin a series of talks focusing on our Anglo-Catholic heritage in conjunction with the Advent 175 celebration. This first talk will be “Manton Eastburn: Man of Sorrows” by Deacon Noyes.


NEWS


We were sad to learn of the death last month of long-time parishioner Nancy Santeusanio Nickolds at her retirement home in Florida. A memorial service will be held at the Advent at a date to be announced.


A Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated for Jeanette Wood, wife of our former parish administrator Jim Wood, on October 19 at 10:00 am at Trinity Church, 81 Elm Street, Concord, MA.


Two of our faithful parishioners will be Received into The Episcopal Church on Saturday, October 26 at 10:30 am at The Cathedral Church of Saint Paul. Ellen Swendrowdki-Evett and Ginny McMackin will be presented by Father Welch on that day so they can receive the laying-on-of-hands by the Bishop and be welcomed into full communion of The Episcopal Church. Please keep them in your prayers as they prepare for the deanery-wide celebration and know that you are welcomed and encouraged to support them by your presence.  


VOLUNTEER(S) NEEDED:

Volunteer Opportunity: Coat Drive. We would like to host a coat drive here at the Advent as we did last year, but we need someone to take the lead and organize it. One Warm Coat is a national non-profit that works to provide a free, warm coat to any person in need, supporting individuals and organizations by providing tools and resources to hold successful drives. If you’re able and willing to take on this good work, please call the parish office or speak to one of the clergy. To learn more, please go to OneWarmCoat.org.


ODDS & ENDS


The flowers that adorn the Church are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish. There is opening for flower memorials or thanksgivings on Sunday, November 17. If you are interested, please contact the parish administrator (office@theadventboston.org).

Floral arrangements at the Advent have been provided by devoted volunteers in the parish Flower Arranging Guild since 1992, providing all of the arrangements in the church. In addition to an enthusiastic, eclectic team of dedicated amateur designers working under the direction of Tom Sopko, drivers who pick up the flowers at the wholesale market and bring them to the church and helpers who unpack and process the material are essential to the functioning of the flower ministry. Several designers and drivers have moved away in the last year, so the Guild is seeking volunteers for these and other tasks. For more information on what is involved, look for a brochure at the back of the church or talk to any of the following Guild members: Tom Sopko, Betsy James, Cassie Gurnon, or Betsy Madsen.


Music Notes: Live recordings of the Advent Choir’s most recent work may always be found at https://soundcloud.com/mark-dwyer-2/tracks. Likewise, repertoire lists are available at https://www.theadventboston.org/1115-music-schedule/, or in the choral music brochures, found in the rear of the church.


Birthday Wish List: As the 175th birthday of the Advent rapidly approaches, we are grateful to all who have given or pledged to the Birthday Wish List. Collectively, they have funded:

  • Restoration of the original Parish Register (1844)
  • Restoration of the original Certificate of Consecration (1894)
  • Framing of the Certificate of Consecration
  • Restoration of the Easter Collect calligraphy (1922)
  • Framing of three watercolors by Robert Turner Walker (1920s)
  • Re-gilding of the original cross in All Saints Chapel (1840)

Our thanks to John Dooley, David Lapin, Daphne B. Noyes, Julianne Ture, Francesco Piscatelli and Judy Bell, and individual members of the Vestry for their combined gift. Additional thanks to all who have supported our Advent 175 commemorative items — and please see the fresh new stock, including postcards, bookmarks, and aprons. Notecards and porcelain ornaments are coming soon.

For those interested in helping support Advent 175 conservation efforts, please consider making a gift towards conservation and restoration of our critically important parish record books, especially those from the 1800s. All gifts — large, small, in-between — help us achieve our goal of preserving these important pieces of the Advent’s past.

— Maria Denslow and Thatcher Gearhart, Co-chairs, Advent 175 Committee

And Speaking of Advent 175:

  • New merchandise: A limited number of votives handcrafted from remnants of candles used at the Church of the Advent are now available. Each votive includes some wax from a Paschal Candle. Suggested donation, to benefit the Conservation Fund, is $2 each.
  • Entr’acte series November 10, 17, 24. More info to come.

FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


Little-known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

One of the best-known origin stories about The Church of the Advent concerns the gilded wooden cross that was used in the parish’s Green Street location. It was this very cross that, together with other ornaments, so infuriated Bishop Manton Eastburn that after his initial visit to the Advent in 1845, he vowed not to return until the chancel arrangement met with his approval. And so he stayed away for 11 years.

But there is another controversy, this one internal, that is less well known. This one concerns William Croswell, the first Rector, and the altar now in All Saints Chapel beneath the infamous cross. British-born architect Frank Wills designed the altar, which was crafted in England. On arrival in December 1850, the altar stones were found to be significantly damaged, “being split through from the face backwards.” Could the altar be accepted as is? After “expressing their own views, and comparing opinions in an informal manner,” the Vestry reached an impasse. Senior Warden Theron Metcalf stated his opposition to “both the reception and the erection of the stone Altar” and left the meeting.

After further discussion, the clerk, Henry Parker, submitted attempt at compromise, moving that the altar be accepted but not installed until repaired. In response, Richard Henry Dana (the notes do not indicate Sr. or Jr.) moved an adjournment to give the group “further time for reflection”; the motion was lost and Dana left the meeting. Parker’s amendment passed.

The altar was again the subject of discussion at the next meeting; no motion was made and the meeting adjourned. In early January 1851 a meeting was called “to consider farther the question of at once erecting the stone altar” which again sparked “a long and informal discussion.” Fitch Edward Oliver’s motion “That we do concur with the views of the Rector, and are of opinion that the Stone Altar should be immediately erected in this building” sparked more discussion; the motion was rejected.

Finally, in mid-February, Croswell called the Vestry together and offered a resolution that was adopted without debate: “That on the Rector’s request the Wardens & Vestry consent that the question of the erection of the stone altar be left entirely to his discretion.”

As part of the Advent 175 restoration efforts, the cross above the stone altar will be re-gilded thanks to a gift to the Conservation Fund. Also in need of regilding are the lettering on the altar and on the carved wooden saints, presenting another opportunity for a gift to the Conservation Fund.


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
October 14-20, 2019

Monday, October 14
Samuel Isaac Joseph Schereschewsky
Holiday: Parish office closed; no morning prayer.

Tuesday, October 15
Teresa of Avila
6:00 pm: Community Supper
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Wednesday, October 16
Hugh Latimer & Nicholas Ridley
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, October 17
Ignatius of Antioch
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, October 18
St Luke
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, October 19
Henry Martyn

10:00 am: Flower Guild
10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Sunday, October 20
Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
10:15 am: Church School / Entr’acte
11:15 am: Solemn Mass
4:30 pm: Organ Recital
5:00 pm: Solemn Evensong & Benediction; Supper & Talk follow