This Week at the Advent, December 1-7, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.

The Advent wreath is given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Norman MacGregor Post, priest, and Jane Irene Post.


TODAY!


Serving as chaplain to Bishop Gates at the 9 o’clock service today is Valerie Cowart, a candidate for ordination to the diaconate in the Diocese of Massachusetts.

175th ANNIVERSARY

9:00 am: Coffee Hour: Hosting today are Bette Boughton and Jonnet Holladay.

10:15 am: Advent wreath-making in the Hunnewell Room (Library). Wreath-making kicks off with Father Welch offering comments on the tradition before the Bishop begins the first wreath. The Bishop will also bless the Advent 175 Time Capsule being assembled by the Church School. Special thanks to Tony Pulsone for handmaking the Christ candles.

1:00–3:00 pm (following 11:15 Mass): Gala Anniversary Reception in Moseley Hall. 

The Advent Bellringers will ring a celebratory quarter peal in the afternoon.

4:30 pm: Organ Recital by David Baskeyfield.

5:00 pm: Lessons & Carols for Advent. Childcare is offered.

6:00–8:00 pm: Please join us for a gala reception in Moseley Hall.


THIS WEEK


Thursday December 5 & Friday, December 6: CONFERENCE – Anglo-Catholic Roots III: Oxford Comes to Boston: 175 years of Anglo-Catholicism in America. Find details or register here.


NEXT SUNDAY!


The Rev’d Sarah Coakley, Assisting Priest and Theologian-in-Residence at the Church of the Ascension and Saint Agnes in Washington, will preach at 9:00 am and 11:15 am on December 8.


Stewardship 2020: Our annual Ingathering of pledges will take place next Sunday, December 8. All parishioners are asked to submit their pledge cards and “Time & Talent” selections by then. Pledges can be received by mail, email, or in the offering plate. (See below for this week’s pledging report.)


Common Cathedral. We are looking for two or three more volunteers on December 8 for Common Cathedral, the outdoor worship service and meal for our homeless neighbors on Boston Common. We meet during coffee hour around 10:30 am to pack the lunches, then head over to the Common together around 11:45 to prepare for the service and meal. Everything wraps up around 2:30. If you are able to help with all or a portion of this event, please email Carolyn Lewis at carolynshadid@gmail.com.


Longtime parishioner David Lapin has recently authored an autobiography entitled The Education of Brainiac: A New Yorker’s Quest for the Good Life in the Hub of the Universe. Vignettes about the Advent abound! A kind of pilgrim’s progress for the twenty-first century, The Education of Brainiac is ultimately about discovering a pluralistic world where institutions of all kinds afford us common ground to express and respect difference in all its prisms. Copies of Brainiac will be available for $20 in Moseley Hall at the coffee hours after the 9 and 11:15 Masses on Sunday, December 8, and David will be on hand to autograph them. Consider adding one to your Christmas stocking!


Compline at the Advent: Join us next Sunday at 8:00 pm, for the ancient liturgy of Compline, preceded by Lucernarium, an evening service of lamp-lighting. We pray Compline, the service of prayer before bedtime in the custom of early Christian monasticism, on the second Sunday of every month.


COMING UP


A Requiem Mass for the repose of the soul of Nancy Santeusanio Nickolds will be offered on Saturday, December 14, at 3:00 pm in the church, with interment in the Columbarium to follow.


STEWARDSHIP


Thanks to those who submitted pledges this week. As of this past Thursday we have received 104 pledges, pledging a total of $334,407. 40 have increased their pledges by over 15% average, and there are 8 new pledges. We have still to hear from 116 parishioners who pledged a total of $252,200 last year. You can pledge online by going to the parish website, https://www.theadventboston.org/pledging.


OUTREACH


Advent Coat Drive extended to December 8. If you have been meaning to donate a coat for the coat drive, you still have an opportunity. Bring clean, functional coats (no broken zippers, ripped pockets, etc.) that will help keep people warm during the winter (think ski jackets, not dress-up jackets) to the church. Coats for children, women, and men all accepted. This year, all collected coats will be donated to Boston Health Care for the Homeless. If you don’t have an appropriate coat to donate, consider a financial contribution. Checks should be made payable to the Church of the Advent, but please put “One Warm Coat” in the memo line and either drop in the collection plate or mail to One Warm Coat Drive, 30 Brimmer Street, Boston 02108. If you have questions or would like to help out, please contact Chris Doty (christopher.doty@pm.me) or Harmony Witte (harmony.witte@gmail.com).


ODDS & ENDS


Book Store News. In Celebration of the Parish Anniversary, all Advent Choir CDs will be on sale for $10.00 each throughout the month of December. Also, Advent Calendars, Christmas cards and music, 2020 “Churchman’s Ordo Kalendars” and Christian Pocket Diaries are now available. The Parish Book Store is open after each Mass on Sundays in Moseley Hall.


Christmas Flower Memorials & Thanksgivings: The greens and flowers that adorn the Church at Christmas are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish. All memorials and thanksgivings will be listed in the service leaflets during the twelve days of Christmas. A form for donations is found on the back page of Sunday’s service leaflet. Completed forms and payment must be received in the Parish Office no later than 4:00 pm on Friday, December 20. Make checks payable to the Church of the Advent and write “Christmas Flowers” on the check. 


Advent Compline at SSJE: On Thursdays during Advent (December 5, 12, and 19), the monks of the Society of St John the Evangelist will offer a contemplative Compline service that is open to all. The service begins at 8:00 pm and is preceded and followed by 30 minutes of quiet meditation by candlelight. The monastery is located at 980 Memorial Drive in Cambridge, a short walk from the Harvard Square T stop.


Discount parking vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


175 Years in One Liturgy

In honor of the 175th anniversary of the founding of the Church of the Advent, we offer an historic tour of some of the Advent’s treasures used in this service.

Crystal Crucifix. This processional cross is crafted of silver, crystal, and cut glass. It was given by the Sunday School sometime between 1885 and 1902.

Verger’s Staff (Virge). See full description below.

White Vestments. These are worn during the opening procession which celebrates the Parish’s Feast of Title and Dedication. Made for the parish’s 1944 centennial, their design traces the doctrine of the Incarnation from the Creation to the early years of the Church:

  • The tunicle worn by the subdeacon displays the symbols of prophets Isaiah and Malachi, who foretold the birth of the Messiah; and of Adam, Eve, and the Garden of Eden; and the Star of David.
  • The dalmatic and stole worn by the deacon contain symbols associated with the birth of Christ: St. Mary, St. Joseph, Gabriel, and the Star of Bethlehem.
  • The priest’s vestments fulfill the symbolism: the stole bears symbols of the Blessed Virgin (MR, Maria Regina), the front panels of the cope honor four theologians who defended and developed the doctrine of the incarnation at the first four ecumenical councils: St. Athanasius; St Gregory Nazianzus; St Cyril; St Leo the Great. The back shows Jesus reigning in glory.

Blue Vestments. Both blue and the more familiar purple are traditional colors for the season of Advent. Blue is also associated with the Blessed Virgin Mary; the embroidered roses on these vestments and on the frontal refer to Mary as the “Mystic Rose” who was to bear the Babe of Bethlehem. The frontal bears two large red shields mounted on crosses of gold. On one shield is IHS, a Latinized abbreviation of the Greek Iesous, for Jesus. On the other, the Latinized abbreviation, XRS, for the Greek Xristos, which means Christ. The vestments were designed in 2017 by Davis d’Ambly, who supervised their execution.

Silver Thurible. The thurible, with its companion boat and spoon, were given in 1913 by the Guild of St. Vincent in memory of Cecil Moreton Barlow, a “reverent, devoted, and faithful member of the Guild and Acolyte.” He was born in 1890, lived in Somerville, where he graduated from the English High School in 1910, and was employed as an electric meter reader. On August 7, 1912, he was killed by “an accidental shock of electricity.” The pieces were designed by Robert Turner Walker (1867–1931), an MIT-trained architect, faithful parishioner, and Vestry member, who instituted the Guild of St. Vincent in the parish. The silversmith is George Joseph Hunt (1866–1947), an Englishman who immigrated to the United States at age 20, became a member of the Society of Arts and Crafts in 1903, and established the “metalry” department at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. These are typically used at the Gospel procession and offertory.

Jeweled Silver Tankard. This large tankard is used on major feasts and was a gift from the congregation at large in memory of Fr. Henry A. Metcalf (1845–1911), who served as rector of five parishes in Massachusetts before becoming Curate at the Advent. The tankard was designed by Charles Carden Coveney (1894–1945), a church architect and member of the Advent’s governing Corporation, who was a principal at Brigham, Coveney & Bisbee. The tankard, of sterling silver with a hammered gold wash, was made by Gorham. The inscription reads Caro enim Mea vere est Cibus, et Sanguinis Meus vere est pontus (For my Flesh is meat indeed, and My blood is drink indeed; John 6:55). 

Jeweled Chalice and Ciborium. In 1905 the congregation made this gift in memory of the Rev. George Frederick Daniels (1858–1897), who had served as a curate at this Parish; he died of pneumonia at St. Margaret’s Hospital on West Cedar Street. The vessels were designed by Brother Bernard, O.S.B., of Painsthorpe Abbey, Yorkshire, England, which was established in 1902 by Aelred Carlyle, a friend of Charles Chapman Grafton, rector of the Advent from 1872 to 1888. The chalice is inscribed: Calicem salutaris accopiam, et nomen Domini invocabo (I will receive the cup of salvation and call upon the name of the Lord; Ps. 116:12).

Silver Chalices. From a set of English Communion ware bearing the hallmark of John James Keith, given by an unknown donor at Easter 1849. Keith produced large amounts of Gothic Revival church plate based on designs by William Butterfield, the leading architect/designer of the ecclesiological movement. Both chalices are inscribed, at the base, Calicem salutaris accipitam (I will receive the cup of salvation; Ps 116:2). One carries the legend Vere est potus sanguis meus (My blood is drink indeed; John 6:55); the other, Omnes eundem potum spiritualem biberunt (All did drink the same spiritual drink; I Cor 10:4).

The Anniversary Virge

Our new Anniversary Virge was designed by Tom Sopko and master silversmith and artist Vincent Wil Hawley, who also fabricated and engraved it. Hailing from Newburyport, MA, Vincent received a BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in 2006 and attended the Advent regularly while living in Boston. He went on to study and apprentice in Florence, Italy, and currently resides in Staten Island, NY. His other ecclesiastical commissions include sacred vessels for churches, sculptural elements for the Episcopal Diocese of New York, and numerous wearable liturgical pieces.A virge (< Latin virga, a branch or rod) was originally a bundle of branches used as a switch or riding crop; it later became a symbol of civil office. In modern times it is best known as the ceremonial staff of the lay officers in Anglican churches known as vergers (originally virgers), who once used it as a weapon to make way for outdoor processions, but now use it as a pointer to guide processions and escort people around the sanctuary.

The virge is hand-crafted, with a sterling silver finial and fittings on a shaft of American walnut. The obverse shows the shield from the parish seal. The trumpet refers to the trumpets that announce the Second Advent, when “the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.” The three coronets allude to the seal of the Diocese of Massachusetts, which in turn took them from the arms of the city of Boston in Lincolnshire, England. In the upper left quadrant is the red cross of St George, symbol of England, surmounted by a circle of wavy blue and white lines, an heraldic device which represents a well or spring. This may allude to our roots in the Church of England, but cross + well is also a rebus for [William] Croswell, our first Rector. The text around the rim reads “Church of the Advent, Boston, 1844–2019.”The virge is given in honor of Kenn Stephens, former member of the Vestry and numerous parish committees, chairman of the 1998 Search Committee that called Fr. Warren, as well as the Liturgical Arts, Gifts & Memorials, and Advent 2000 committees, and founder, director, and mentor of the parish Flower Guild from 1992 until 2007.

The reverse features a plain golden cross and the parish motto “Lo, I come.” Both refer back to the earliest days of the parish in 1845, when the simple gilded wood cross that is now enshrined in the reredos of All Saints’ Chapel hung above the altar, with the motto above it. Author, lawyer, and abolitionist Richard Henry Dana Jr., one of the most prominent founding members, later wrote to his son, “[Dr. Croswell] held the first service on Advent Sunday. That led to its being called the Church of the Advent. I proposed the name, and suggested the cross over the altar, and the words ‘Lo I Come’ for the motto.”

The 1944 parish history states that “In the earlier years the duties of verger – or sexton – were undertaken by no less a personage than one of the wardens; but it is not to be wondered that after a time he found the burden of attending to the opening and closing of the church for services twice daily to be too great. About 1852 Hugh Taylor was appointed Verger, and held the position for nearly 40 years.” Ray Porter’s predecessor Marc Michelini (1927-2014) became verger at the age of 22 and served faithfully for 56 years. Since 1852 the Advent has had 14 rectors, but only 6 vergers!


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
December 2-8, 2019

Monday, December 2
Channing Moore Williams
7:00 pm: Girl Scouts Cookie Jamboree

Tuesday, December 3
Francis Xavier
9:00 am: Beacon Hill Garden Club
6:00 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, December 4
John of Damascus
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal
7:00 pm: Brimmer Street Garage Annual Meeting

Thursday, December 5
Clement of Alexandria
3:30 pm: Anglo-Catholic Conference Checkin
4:00 pm: Anglo-Catholic Conference Keynote
6:00 pm: Solemn Evensong & Benediction

Friday, December 6
Nicholas of Myra
10:00 am: Anglo-Catholic Conference Sessions
11:30 am: Rosary
12:15 pm: Low Mass
2:00 pm: Anglo-Catholic Conference Sessions
6:00 pm: Solemn Mass – Banquet

Saturday, December 7
Ambrose of Milan

8:30 am: Morning Prayer
9:00 am: Low Mass

Sunday, December 8
The Second Sunday of Advent
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
10:15 am: Church School
11:15 am: Solemn Mass
8:00 pm: Compline

Collect for Advent Sunday

Almighty God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness, and put upon us the armor of light, now in the time of this mortal life in which thy Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the quick and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

This Week at the Advent, November 24-30, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Frances Lee McCormick and Barbara McCormick.

The flowers in the crossing are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of Staff Sgt. Matthew Albert Pucino, U.S. Army Special Forces.


TODAY!


9:00 Coffee Hour: Hosting today are Carolyn Shadid & Jason Lewis, along with David Russo & Matthew McNeff. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com, if you’re interested or have questions.

11:15 Coffee Hour: Hosting this morning are Thatcher Gearhart, Robin Landrith, and Kyriell Paleologue. We are always in need of more volunteers; to view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Betsy James (ejames4@nc.rr.com).


Entr’acte: Today in the Hunnewell Room (Library), Tom Sopko and Deacon Daphne B. Noyes present “To the Blessed Advent: Treasures from the Vault.” Rare treasures, rarely seen (up close at any rate), each with a tale to tell.


THIS WEEK


For Thanksgiving Day, there will be a celebration of the Mass with hymns at 10:00 am and a Thanksgiving Potluck in Moseley Hall at 3:00 pm. Turkeys will be provided for the meal; to sign up to bring an item (or items) to share, go to www.signupgenius.com/go/30e0d49aca722a4f85-thanksgiving. For questions, please see Meg Nelson or Betsy James. The Parish office will be closed on both Thursday and Friday, and there will be no Morning or Evening Prayer. Also, no midday Mass on Thursday.


NEXT SUNDAY!


ADVENT 175
Schedule of Events

Sunday, Dec 1 175th Anniversary of the Church of the Advent

Please note: Ingathering of pledges will take place Sunday, December 8; healing will be offered that day as well.

9:00 am: Sung Mass with Procession, Bishop Alan M. Gates will celebrate and preach.

10:15 am: Make an Advent wreath in the Hunnewell Room (Library). Wreath-making kicks off with Father Welch offering comments on the tradition and the Bishop begins the first wreath. The Bishop will also bless the Advent 175 Time Capsule being assembled by the Church School. Special thanks to Tony Pulsone for handmaking the Christ candles.
Coffee Hour in Moseley Hall with special treats! Bette Boughton and Jonnet Holladay will pour.

11:15 am: Solemn High Mass with Reception of the Bishop and Procession. Bishop Gates will celebrate and preach.

1:00 – 3:00 pm: Gala Anniversary Reception in Moseley Hall.

The Advent Bellringers will ring a celebratory quarter peal in the afternoon.

4:30 pm: Organ Recital by David Baskeyfield.

5:00 pm: Lessons & Carols for Advent, followed by a gala reception in Moseley Hall. Childcare is offered during this service.

Thursday December 5, and Friday December 6: Third Annual Anglo-Catholic Conference “175 Years of Anglo-Catholic Roots”

Sunday, December 8: The Rev’d Sarah Coakley, Assisting Priest and Theologian-in-Residence at the Church of the Ascension and Saint Agnes in Washington, will preach at 9:00 am and 11:15 am.

Throughout all this activity, the Advent 175 team will continue to offer commemorative items during coffee hours. Just received: matted prints of “Veni, Veni Emmanuel!” watercolor by Robert Turner Walker (original is on display), and notecards with pencil sketch of the Advent by Morris Henry Hobbs.


COMING UP


Common Cathedral.We are looking for two or three more volunteers on December 8 for Common Cathedral, the outdoor worship service and meal for our homeless neighbors on Boston Common. We meet during coffee hour around 10:30 am to pack the lunches, then head over to the Common together around 11:45 to prepare for the service and meal. Everything wraps up around 2:30. If you are able to help with all or a portion of this event, please email Carolyn Lewis at carolynshadid@gmail.com.


A Requiem Mass for the repose of the soul of Nancy Santeusanio Nickolds will be offered on Saturday, December 14, at 3:00 pm in the church, with interment in the Columbarium to follow.


STEWARDSHIP


Dear Fellow Advent Parishioners:

Our Stewardship Campaign 2020, with this year’s theme “Sustaining a vibrant community of worship” at The Advent, plus extending our outreach to be inclusive of all parishioners through your “Time & Talent” support of selected worship activities, is rapidly approaching a key date of December 1 as we celebrate both the First Sunday of Advent and our milestone 175th Anniversary Celebration. This special occasion marks the beginning of the Advent Season and serves as an opportunity for all Advent parishioners to join in on the planned services and activities for this wonderful Anniversary Event, to include the daylong presence and mass celebration and preaching by our Bishop Alan M. Gates. See Sunday’s bulletin or go online for the “Advent 175 Schedule of Events.”

Our 2020 campaign is off to an excellent start thanks to everyone who has already pledged. We are hopeful to receive the remaining pledge submittals in order to maintain the momentum through this Advent Season. Please remember that for our Campaign 2020 both forms of our pledge contributions are important as a community of worship at this sacred place, our beloved Church of the Advent. Your monetary pledge contributions support the necessary financial well-being as guided by the Wardens and Vestry; your “Time & Talent” pledge contributions fulfill the necessities of a meaningful relationship to worship, which you choose to celebrate in the service of the Lord.

We have scheduled the “Ingathering of pledges” to take place on Sunday, December 8. Please be reminded to get your pledge cards and “Time & Talent” selections in by this date, either by mail, online, or simply by dropping in Sunday’s offering plate. Our campaign will continue through the Advent Season, and the earlier we receive your pledge commitments the better able we are to assist the Wardens and Vestry with their important planning for 2020.

Thank you in advance.

We are yours in the service of our Lord Jesus Christ,

Francesco Piscitelli & Thatcher Gearhart

Stewardship Campaign 2020, Co-Chairmen

Stewardship 2020 Report

As of this past Thursday we have received 78 pledges, pledging a total of $265,952. 32 have increased their pledges by nearly 13%, and there are 2 new pledges. We have still to hear from 136 parishioners who pledged a total of $306,608 last year. You can pledge online by going to the parish website, https://www.theadventboston.org/pledging.


OUTREACH


Advent Coat Drive concludes this Wednesday, November 27. If you have been meaning to donate a coat for the coat drive, time is running out. But you still have an opportunity. Bring clean, functional coats (no broken zippers, ripped pockets, etc.) that will help keep people warm during the winter (think ski jackets, not dress-up jackets) to the church by this Wednesday. Coats for children, women, and men all accepted. This year, all collected coats will be donated to Boston Health Care for the Homeless. If you don’t have an appropriate coat to donate, consider a financial contribution. Checks should be made payable to the Church of the Advent, but please put “One Warm Coat” in the memo line and either drop in the collection plate or mail to One Warm Coat Drive, 30 Brimmer Street, Boston 02108. If you have questions or would like to help out, please contact Chris Doty (christopher.doty@pm.me) or Harmony Witte (harmony.witte@gmail.com).


ODDS & ENDS


Book Store News. Advent Calendars, Christmas cards and music, 2020 “Churchman’s Ordo Kalendars” and Christian Pocket Diaries are now available at our Parish Book Store, which is open after each Mass on Sundays in Moseley Hall.


Christmas Flower Memorials & Thanksgivings: The greens and flowers that adorn the Church at Christmas are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish. All memorials and thanksgivings will be listed in the service leaflets during the twelve days of Christmas. A form for donations is found on the back page of Sunday’s service leaflet. Completed forms and payment must be received in the Parish Office no later than 4:00 pm on Friday, December 20. Make checks payable to the Church of the Advent and write “Christmas Flowers” on the check. 


Anglo-Catholic Roots III: “Oxford Comes to Boston: 175 Years of Anglo-Catholicism in America” will take place December 5-6, 2019 at the Advent. Find more information and register here


Discount parking vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


Little-known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

The 1944 Centennial Celebration of the Church of the Advent commenced on The Feast of Christ the King and ran through Easter. A very partial, extremely impressive list of events includes Solemn Evensong and Benediction; Solemn Evensong and Te Deum; Youth Rally; sermons from The Right Reverend Wallace E. Conckling, Bishop of Chicago; the Right Reverend Henry Knox Sherrill, Bishop of Massachusetts; and the Right Reverend Raymond A. Heron, Bishop Suffragan of Massachusetts; a Parish Banquet at the Copley Plaza; Historical Exhibit and Display of Sacred Vessels and Vestments; Acolyte Festival Commemorating the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Order of St. Vincent; Confirmation; Anglican Choir Festival; Solemn Requiem Mass for those Killed in War; Service Commemorating the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Formal Restoration of the Religious Life in the Anglican Communion; Gregorian Choir Festival; a four-day Parochial Mission — all this in addition to the regular round of daily services. Below is a Foreword from the Centennial Celebration program (click to enlarge).


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
November 25-December 1, 2019

Monday, November 25
James Otis Sargent Huntington

Tuesday, November 26
6:00 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, November 27
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, November 28
Office closed; no Morning or Evening Prayer; no 12:15 Mass
10:00 am: Sung Mass with Hymns
3:00 pm: Thanksgiving Potluck

Friday, November 29
Office closed; no Morning or Evening Prayer
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, November 30
Saint Andrew the Apostle

10:00 am: Flower Guild
12:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Sunday, December 1
The First Sunday of Advent
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Procession & Sung Mass
10:15 am: Wreath-Making
11:15 am: Solemn Mass with Reception of the Bishop and Procession
1:00 pm: Advent 175 Gala Reception
4:30 pm: Organ Recital by David Baskeyfield
5:00 pm: Lessons & Carols for Advent; Reception follows

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Daphne B. Noyes at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, November 17, 2019, the Twenty-third Sunday after Pentecost

The art — or craft — of headline writer is highly specialized, absolutely critical, and frequently overlooked. A headline must be brief, but factual. Enticing, but informative. This is no easy task. Consider this memorable headline from a few years ago: “Smoking more dangerous than thought.”

With that in mind, I wonder what headline might be written for today’s gospel from Luke? [1] The message, or messages, seem elusive, as the narrative moves from the jewel-encrusted temple to warnings of wars and tumults and danger and destruction. There’s a prediction of devastating times to come—a prediction that is an uncannily accurate description of the time we live in. There is a warning, of trials and troubles—all of which have an uneasy, even horrifying, resonance to the trials and troubles with which we are so sadly familiar.

At the same time, there is reassurance. And yet…

I would be less than truthful if I said I knew precisely what to make of the Gospel lesson before us now.

If you have no personal experience or memory of a temple that has fallen, not stone left upon stone, let me offer an example from our common history — I mean, the history of this parish.

I refer to 35 Bowdoin Street, for many years home to the Church of the Advent, then to the Parish of St. John the Evangelist. It is now a different kind of temple, where the price of admission is not belief or baptism, but — to be blunt — money.[2] The property — 27,000 square feet — can be yours for $11 million.

Another example: Immaculate Conception Church on Harrison Avenue. What is the connection? This is the place where in 1879, Amanda Tarbell Croswell, widow of William Croswell, first rector of the Church of the Advent, was baptized “sub cond” [3] by a Jesuit priest. [4] Her husband had died 28 years previously; she was 79 years old. Now, 140 years later, that building, too, is in the process of being converted — converted into luxury condominiums. [5]

Of course, this is not only about the closing of churches and creation of condominiums. There is an ache in the soul when what we see and treasure, what we thought would always be there, is no longer. The older one gets, the surer one becomes of this: That the things that last — tangible, intangible; visible, invisible — are not always the things you think, you hope, will last. Not even the big, impressive, amazingly beautiful ones. Not even the ones that have been central to your formation and identity.

As to the persecution that Jesus describes, I suspect that many of us could speak from direct personal experience to some form of it; while we may not have been summoned to face kings and governors, there are many who have encountered, and been harmed by, the rigid rules of those in authority who wield their power not for the common good but for the preservation of their own position.

Do you doubt this?

Anyone who is considered “the other” — women, people of color, people who don’t fit into an unyielding binary structure — all face myriad forms of diminishment, degradation, or persecution.

Many have experienced betrayal at the hand of trusted loved ones. Nation does rise against nation and kingdom against kingdom: Syria, Iraq, Venezuela, Hong Kong, Lebanon…the list goes on. The words we hear from Luke’s gospel have a resonance that is personal, political, timeless.

For those who hear this reading as meant for them, the concluding words are surely, perhaps counter-intuitively (based on what has come before), meant to be words of promise and hope spoken directly to each one of us: “Not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your lives.”

The words to cling to are those where Jesus offers reassurance that all you have to do — all we have to do — is hang on, endure.

But spiritual fatigue, gripping discouragement, often lead to a place of hopelessness. Sometimes, for me, perhaps for you, too, even Jesus’ words of reassurance do not ring true. But what does ring true is that they are his words, and he is with me. And with you. And with those in the temple, admiring its jewels and finely carved stones; with those standing accused before kings and governors; with those struggling amidst a famine of the soul or pestilence of the body; with those suffering at the hands of ones they loved and trusted.

That’s not the headline; that’s the whole story. Amen.


[1] Lk 21:5-19

[2] https://www.admeliorallc.com/Projects/35Bowdoin.htm

[3] sub cond. sub conditione (i.e., “conditionally”), used when a person may have been baptized before (perhaps by a Protestant cleric, for example) or there may be some question about the validity of the earlier baptism.

[4] She died a year later, leaving $300 to Immaculate Conception for “Masses for the repose of my soul.”

[5] https://www.apartments.com/771-harrison-ave-boston-ma-unit-105/jyxlnl4/

Collect for the Twenty-third Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 28)

Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning: Grant that we may in such wise hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them; that, by patience and comfort of thy holy Word, we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast given us in our savior Jesus Christ; who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

This Week at the Advent, November 17-23, 2019

Welcome to the Church of the Advent! If you are new to the area, visiting, or seeking a church home, we are glad you’re here and hope to have a chance to greet you in person. Please join us downstairs following the service for a coffee hour.

Child care is offered during the 9 am and 11:15 am services; an usher can guide you to the nursery.

Welcome cards are located in each pew; please fill one out so we can keep in touch.


The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of James V. McNeff and Peter J. McNeff.


TODAY!


9:00 Coffee Hour: Angie Corbet and Maggie Dunbar host today. Next week’s hosts are Carolyn Shadid & Jason Lewis, and David Russo & Matthew McNeff. If you would like to sign up to host coffee hour, please contact Barbara Boles by phone, 617-501-7572, or email, bbolesster@gmail.com, if you’re interested or have questions.

11:15 Coffee Hour: Hosting this morning are Catherine Birdwell & Nicholas Edwards, along with Betsy James. We are always in need of more volunteers; to view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/. If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Betsy James (ejames4@nc.rr.com).


Entr’acte: Today in the Hunnewell Room (Library); please note change in location: “Ah Yes, I Remember it Well” with Will Joyner, Melissa Fox, and Hal Langell reflecting on their experiences over the decades. Next Sunday, Tom Sopko and Deacon Noyes reveal some rarely seen Advent treasures; see the Advent 175 Schedule of Events below for more info.  


Advent Tour: Today our Verger, Raymond Porter, will give a 10–15 minute tour of the church building following the 11:15 Mass. Meet him in the Baptistry immediately following the Postlude and learn about our fascinating, complicated, historic building.


Evensong & Benediction, today at 5:00 pm, sung by The Advent Choir. This will be a particularly deluxe program, featuring motets by Parry, the B Minor Evening Service of Howells, and Benediction motets by Frenchmen Villette and Widor. The service lasts no more than one hour, and is followed by a light supper and libation in Moseley Hall to which all are invited. During the supper, Mark Dwyer will speak about Music and the Anglo-Catholic Revival: “O Worship the Lord in the Holiness of Beauty.” Concurrent theological, artistic, architectural and musical movements came together during the mid-nineteenth century to produce an ongoing search for the ideal sacred music: that which is beautifully fitting, and fittingly beautiful. Not everyone had the same idea of what that might be. Come to Evensong and find out!

Stephan Griffin, our friend and neighbor from All Saints Brookline, will play a Prelude Organ Recital at 4:30 pm, featuring works of Buxtehude, Duruflé and Farrington. Mr Griffin holds a Master’s Degree in Organ Performance from The University of Texas at Austin, where his principal teachers were Drs Gerre and Judith Hancock. Mr Griffin also holds a degree in voice from Boston University and did additional vocal study at the Royal College of Music in London. When not working at All Saints, he can regularly be seen (and his fine baritone heard) deputizing in our choir stalls.


THIS WEEK


Theology on Tap returns this Tuesday, November 19, at 7:00 pm at Silvertone Bar & Grill, 69 Bromfield Street in downtown Boston. Our own Fr. Jay James will discuss the Sacrament of Confession.

The nineteenth-century catholic renewal within Anglicanism saw a deepening of teaching and practice in the sacramental life of the Church. The use of auricular confession was one such practice and the catholic renewal movement has continued to teach and reclaim the great gift offered the Christian in confession, penance, and absolution. The assurance of the grace of forgiveness of sins in the Sacrament of Confession will be explained by following its historical practice. The evening’s presentation will include a description of how to make a sacramental confession, the benefits of Confession being part of one’s spiritual life, and how sacramental confession has been used at The Church of the Advent.

Fr. James served as Rector of Saint Timothy’s Church and School in Raleigh, N.C. for nearly 25 years before coming to the Advent in January 2018. Before serving St. Timothy’s, he was curate at All Saints’, Ashmont. Throughout his ministry he has been involved in the regular worship, outreach, and activities that mark life in a parish with definite catholic and evangelical history and practices, and concentrated among other things on Christian education. Father James is also the Director of St. Michael’s Conference for young people.


ADVENT 175


Schedule of Events

Sunday, Nov 17, 10:15 am: Entr’acte:: “Ah Yes, I Remember it Well” with Will Joyner, Melissa Fox, and Hal Langell reflecting on their experiences over the decades. Hunnewell Room (Library); please note change in location.

Sunday, Nov 24, 10:15 am: Entr’acte: “To the Blessed Advent: Treasures from the Vault” with Tom Sopko and Deacon Daphne B. Noyes. Rare treasures, rarely seen (up close at any rate), each with a tale to tell. Hunnewell Room.

Sunday, Dec 1 175th Anniversary of the Church of the Advent

Please note: Ingathering of pledges will take place Sunday, December 8; healing will be offered that day as well.

9:00 am: Sung Mass with Procession, Bishop Alan M. Gates will celebrate and preach.

10:15 am: Make an Advent wreath in the Hunnewell Room (Library). Father Welch will comment on the tradition, and the Bishop will join church school families and others to create wreaths. He will also bless the Advent 175 Time Capsule being assembled by the Church School. Coffee Hour in Moseley Hall with special treats! Bette Boughton and Jonnet Holladay will pour.

11:15 am: Solemn High Mass with Reception of the Bishop and Procession. Bishop Gates will celebrate and preach.

1:00 – 3:00 pm: Gala Anniversary Reception in Moseley Hall.

The Advent Bellringers will ring a celebratory quarter peal in the afternoon.

4:30 pm: Organ Recital by David Baskeyfield.

5:00 pm: Lessons & Carols for Advent, followed by a gala reception in Moseley Hall. Childcare is offered during this service.

Thursday December 5, and Friday December 6: Third Annual Anglo-Catholic Conference “175 Years of Anglo-Catholic Roots”

Sunday, December 8: The Rev’d Sarah Coakley, Assisting Priest and Theologian-in-Residence at the Church of the Ascension and Saint Agnes in Washington, will preach at 9:00 am and 11:15 am.

Throughout all this activity, the Advent 175 team will continue to offer commemorative items during coffee hours. Just received: matted prints of “Veni, Veni Emmanuel!” watercolor by Robert Turner Walker (original is on display), and notecards with pencil sketch of the Advent by Morris Henry Hobbs.


COMING UP


Thanksgiving Potluck: Please join us for a Thanksgiving potluck on Thanksgiving Day in Moseley Hall beginning at 3:00 pm. Turkeys will be provided. Please see Meg Nelson or Betsy James to sign up to bring an item (or items) to share.


STEWARDSHIP


Returns for the 2020 Canvass are arriving! Thanks to everyone who have pledged so promptly! Thus far, 57 pledges have been received, totalling just shy of $176,600. 

If you have not yet pledged, please do so soon. The Committee encourages all parishioners to get their pledges submitted on or before December 8.

You can pledge online by going to the parish website, https://www.theadventboston.org/pledging.


OUTREACH


Advent Coat Drive Continues through Friday, November 29.

As in previous years, the Advent is holding a coat drive to help keep those in need warm this winter. This year, all collected coats will be donated to Boston Health Care for the Homeless. You can help by:

  • Donating Coats: Bring clean, functional coats (no broken zippers, ripped pockets, etc.) that will help keep people warm during the winter (think ski jackets, not dress-up jackets) to 30 Brimmer Street, Sundays 8 am-1 pm; Monday-Friday 9 am-3 pm. The collection bin is located in the library. Coats for children, women, and men all accepted.
  • Donating Dollars: Make checks payable to the Church of the Advent, but put “One Warm Coat” in the memo line and either drop in the collection plate or mail to One Warm Coat Drive, 30 Brimmer Street, Boston MA 02108.

If you have questions or would like to help out, please contact Chris Doty (christopher.doty@pm.me) or Harmony Witte (harmony.witte@gmail.com).


ODDS & ENDS


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? Email: nsheffer@newview.org.


Erratum: In reporting last Sunday on Father Loring’s recognition at the Diocesan Convention, we incorrectly stated that Father Loring served for 27 years at St. John’s Church in Charlestown. Although he did serve there briefly, the church he served for 27 years was St Luke’s Church in Chelsea.


Anglo-Catholic Roots III: “Oxford Comes to Boston: 175 Years of Anglo-Catholicism in America” will take place December 5-6, 2019 at the Advent. Find more information and register here


Discount parking vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer. You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte. The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday. Questions? email: nsheffer@newview.org.


FROM THE ADVENT ARCHIVES


Little-known facts, amusing anecdotes, and miscellaneous wisdom, in honor of the 175th anniversary of this parish.

No sooner was the restoration of the 1844 Parish Register completed, thanks to personal gifts from members of the Vestry, than a new generous donation to the Conservation Fund was received. In keeping with the donor’s wishes, these funds will be used to conserve the Parish’s Record of Baptisms, which stretches from 1844 to 1923.

Why is it important to preserve these record books? Here is one story to illustrate – a letter received in February 2006, slightly condensed, with initials used in lieu of full names to protect privacy.

  …As Executor for my Father’s estate, I have been progressively sorting through items in our parent’s home. My mother, C., passed away in 1983 and my father in 2004. Today, I discovered part of a letter written by my Grandmother, N., photocopied on the attached sheet. I have been able to transcribe most of what Grandma had written. She passed away in 1953.

I have very little knowledge of my Grandmother’s parents or her family. What is most remarkable is her reference to the Church of the Advent which adds another positive link to my search for family information. What I have been able to learn is that she had at least one brother, J., who may have been a few years younger. He died in an Army Hospital in Denver, Colorado, about 1904 as a result of serving in the Spanish American War in the Philippines.

I believe that my grandmother was born in 1874, I do not know where but her letter implies it may have been Fitchburg; she writes “my two brothers was at the same time…”; by this she may have meant that she and her brothers were baptized at the same time. She went on to write …all dead. She possibly implied that at the time of writing her letter that her brothers were dead.

Would it be possible for me to request a photocopy of my Grandmother’s October 24, 1886 Baptism record, and associated information if other members of her family were also baptized at that time? Enclosed is a donation for searching your historical records. I very much appreciate your kindness.

The record of baptism of grandmother and brothers was found and the information sent to the writer. Reading her letter — a copy and transcription are below; click on the image to see it full size — the importance of preserving and appreciating these old books becomes clear.


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
November 18-November 24, 2019

Monday, November 18
Hilda of Whitby

Tuesday, November 19
Elizabeth of Hungary
6:00 pm: Community Supper
7:00 pm: Theology on Tap at Silvertone’s Bar & Grill

Wednesday, November 20
Edmund of East Anglia
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringers

Thursday, November 21
Presentation of the Blessed Virgin
5:15 pm: Property Committee
6:15 pm: Vestry
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, November 22
Cecilia of Rome
11:30 am: Rosary

Saturday, November 23
Clement of Rome

10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal
10:00 am: Flower Guild

Sunday, November 24
The First of Christ the King
7:30 am: Morning Prayer
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Procession & Sung Mass
10:15 am: Church School / Entr’acte
11:15 am: Procession & Solemn Mass & Te Deum

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Jay C. James at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, November 10, 2019, the Twenty-second Sunday after Pentecost

From the Second Letter of Saint Paul to the Thessalonians, Now may Our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God our Father, who loved us and gave us eternal comfort and good hope through grace, comfort your hearts and establish them in every good work and word.  

Life in heaven and on earth for the Christian is a life of healing and hope.  

A professor of Old Testament in seminary possessed a very dry wit and used humorous comments to keep his class engaged.  Let’s face it, trudging through the books of the Law or those really long books of the major prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations of Jeremiah, Ezekiel,  Daniel, Hosea) can be deadly and lead to a class of heads nodding off to sleep. This is true even for those who want to study the Old Testament, let alone for those who are required to study it.  This professor, who was also a priest, said that one of the prooftexts that he uses as his basis for pastoral care is this passage from Jeremiah Chapter 12, Verse 5:  If you have raced with men on foot, and they have wearied you, how will you compete with horses?  And if in a safe land you fall down, how will you do in the jungle of the Jordan? In other words, his response to people who came to him seeking words of comfort and solace where these:  If you think it’s bad now, just wait!  That was his attempt at keeping his class entertained with humor.  It’s not the most helpful thing to say when someone is in need of reassuring or caring words.  Can you imagine saying that to someone about to undergo a very serious operation or in the midst of a personal crisis?  Oh, don’t worry, if you think this is bad, just wait!  Not the best bedside manner for a pastor. 

A better approach for a pastor would be to direct the troubled or wearied Christian toward the love and freely given grace of  God. This is at the heart of the bodily Resurrection taught and witnessed to by God’s Son, Jesus Christ. Jesus gives a great lesson to the Sadducees in the Gospel for today about how the Resurrection is our hope for both the future and for our lives even now.  When we look at this challenge the Sadducees are presenting to Jesus we can learn what a great hope we have because of His Bodily Resurrection. From Saint Paul’s Letter to the Thessalonians we can also learn what a gift of strength we have in the Resurrection to make it through tough times in our lives now.   

In our Gospel passage today we get a word about how good our ultimate end and purpose is.  We learn from Jesus that life in heaven is so far beyond the condition of our lives here in the world, that it is difficult to imagine what joy there is.  The Sadducees were so bent on teaching that there is not a resurrection of the dead, that they come up with this very literal example to try to stump Jesus.  In the example, seven brothers die after doing their duty of taking this one woman as their wife. When the woman dies and goes to heaven, whose wife will she be?  Jesus immediately teaches that marriage is not needed in heaven. The relations we have here are necessary but are not necessary in heaven. Jesus says, The children of this world marry, and are given in marriage:  but they which shall be accounted worthy to obtain that world, and the resurrection from the dead, neither marry, nor are given in marriage:  neither can they die any more: for they are equal unto the angels and are the children of God, being the children of the resurrection.  The eternal life with God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit unites us so perfectly with God and each other that the marital relations are not considered because they are not necessary.  

That kind of unity is what we are moving toward when we’re on our way to heaven.  The next life, in other words, is far superior to this life. I love the words of the proper preface when a requiem is said, …for to Thy faithful people O Lord, life is changed, not ended.  We move through this life to the life of perfection.  Again, things will not always be the same for us, they will get better and especially in the hereafter.  

We have this principle of God’s love for us lived out when we hear and read the lessons from the Eucharistic lectionary in our Prayer Book.  As we approach the end of the Church Year and head into the season of Advent we will find that the Sunday lessons will take a definite trajectory to heaven.  We will hear about the true temple of worship before the Throne of God and know that Christ the King is ruling from the throne of God His Father. So you see, we are left at the end of the Church Year where we should be and that is with the King of Kings and Lord of Lords in heaven.  

It’s true for the end of our lives that things not only get better, but they become perfected.  It’s also true for the Christian now in light of the power of the bodily Resurrection. Our lives in this world with the Holy Ghost operating in us, and for us, gives a real purpose and direction to our lives.  We can know this power of the Resurrection even now while we are in this world. It is part of the love of God to make us in such a way to live under His grace even now. God made human life, and all life for that matter, to want to live, to want to get better, to strive for grow.  We see it all around us and we see it in us. In nature we see tremendous strength of the roots of the trees pushing the bricks of the sidewalk up so they can grow bigger and stronger. We see even the thinnest piece of grass attempting to live even between cracks in the bricks, seemingly pushing God-ward.  We know it’s true that our bodies are made in such a way to heal themselves because we are intended and made for life. There’s something about human life that is intended to remain alive and growing. That is really because of the love of God.        

This gives us great hope.  We know our ultimate end and purpose and simply knowing our true end should give us hope that we will someday be there with the God who loves us.  This direction and purpose for our lives in this world gives us hope. We have a direction and purpose for our lives in this world. We have a source of encouragement and strength now.  As Saint Paul tells the Thessalonians: To this he called you through our Gospel, so that you may obtain the glory of Our Lord Jesus Christ.  So then, Brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.  Now may Our Lord Jesus Christ Himself, and God our Father, who loved us and gave us eternal comfort and good hope through grace, comfort your hearts and establish them in every good work and word.   

What do we do in times of confusion, or sadness, or when the weight of even day-to-day pressures seem overwhelming?  The first thing is to remember there is a direction and purpose to our lives. We are hoping for a future where all our cares and concerns are behind us.  We are given hope in the knowledge that the Holy Ghost is moving us forward and the way things are now are not the way things will always be. The advice of Saint Paul is very well taken.  We don’t have to look for a source of strength, we have it in God’s grace. We don’t have to reinvent what the Church teaches. We have the source of all teaching for the Christian in the Bodily Resurrection.  We don’t have to redo or reinvent the tradition of the Church. We should, according to Saint Paul, Stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by (us), either by word of mouth or by letter.  

In times of trouble or sorrow or confusion about what this world has handed to you, rely on your church family, on your prayer life and those praying for you.  Avail yourself of the grace offered to you in the Word written and the Eucharist. Let your family and friends in the Church support you. As practicing Christians, we will be comforted.  

In the life of the Christian, in both the immediate circumstances and the ultimate end and purpose for the Christian, it is true that things do get better.  The way things are now is not the way things are going to be forever.  We are intended to grow more and more into a life with Jesus and a life with him is a life that will be better and better in both good times and in times of suffering.  We are to ultimately spend our eternal life with him in perfect unity with God the Holy Trinity. What a joy that is to be. We will be strengthened. We will come closer and closer to the full knowledge and love of the Lord now, and join him at His heavenly Throne. 

In the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost. Amen.

Collect for the Twenty-Second Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 27)

O God, whose blessed Son was manifested that he might destroy the works of the devil and make us children of God and heirs of eternal life: Grant us, we beseech thee, that, having this hope, we may purify ourselves even as he is pure; that, when he shall appear again with power and great glory, we may be made like unto him in his eternal and glorious kingdom; where with thee, O Father, and thee, O Holy Ghost, he liveth and reigneth ever, one God, world without end. Amen.