Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Daphne B. Noyes at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, April 22, 2018, the Fourth Sunday of Easter

The fourth Sunday of Easter has long been known as Good Shepherd Sunday, thanks to the appointed readings, especially that which we have just heard from John’s Gospel, wherein Jesus states in no uncertain terms: “I am the Good Shepherd.”

Due to Easter’s moveable date, Good Shepherd Sunday does not always occur in April — but this year it does fall within the thirty days called by T. S. Eliot “the cruelest month.”

Now I’m not a scholar of Eliot, so can’t pretend to know what he had in mind when he named April as the cruelest month, but there certainly are many April events — some within living memory, some historical — that lend heft and credibility to that designation. Most recently, the fifth anniversary of the Marathon bombing, and the nineteenth anniversary of the Columbine school shootings.

There are many other examples: The assassinations of Abraham Lincoln (1865) and of Martin Luther King Jr. (1968). School shootings at Virginia Tech (2007) and — just two days ago — a high school in Ocala, Florida. The Bataan Death March (1942) and the protest in Tienanmen Square (1989). The explosion and fire at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (1986) and explosion of Apollo 13 (1970). The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City (1995) and the entry of the United States into World War I (1917). The Warsaw Ghetto uprising (1942), commemorated just ten days ago on April 12, Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom Hashoah).

This is a sad, sobering — and incomplete — litany of events. In “this joyous Eastertide” it serves as a reminder that the flock of humanity lives in a broken, fallen world.

Centuries of romanticized depictions of Jesus as the Good Shepherd have, I suspect, led to the assumption or belief (even if unconsciously) that the Good Shepherd is a soft, tender presence, calmly gazing upon the little vulnerable lamb he cradles in his arms, or carries across his shoulders. In the classic, familiar images of the Good Shepherd, there is nary a wolf; the assembled flock surrounds the Shepherd, unharmed, unalarmed. In these idealized images, there is only one Shepherd, one flock. But it is not so in the world we live in, is it?

Even the deepest devotion to the Good Shepherd cannot deny the reality of this wild, unruly world; the persistence of questions without answers; the ever-present dangers of frightened hirelings and fierce wolves.

I don’t believe there’s any need to enter into an explanation of the relationship between sheep and shepherd, or to attempt to examine the metaphor of Jesus is to Shepherd as we are to sheep. I suspect that even those with no rural experience get it.

But there is an aspect of this relationship that does warrant our attention: that is, the good-ness of the Good Shepherd, especially in light of the horrendous events of this “cruelest month” — not to mention the other eleven months of the year.

In declaring “I am the Good Shepherd” Jesus refers back to the prophet Ezekiel’s warnings and alarms about the dangers that threaten an unguarded or neglected flock. He counters Ezekiel’s description of the flock’s perils by proclaiming his devotion — “The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep” — and his intimate knowledge of each member of the flock: “I know my own.” But perhaps most importantly, he provides what is arguably the most concrete statement of his own identity: not vine, not bread, not door, not way nor truth nor light, but Shepherd. How much resonance would that have to those who heard his words, and who repeated them, and wrote them down, two millennia ago?

And how deeply do they stir those who hear them now: Those longing to be led to peaceful green pastures. Those living on the edge, in harm’s way thanks to an uncaring or selfish hired hand…Those reluctant to leave the sheepfold’s closed community. Those imperiled by the wolves of anger or addiction. Those not sure which flock, or shepherd, is theirs. Those wandering far from the flock in search of — what?

Even as we, like sheep, persist in going astray — “perverse and foolish oft I strayed” — the Good Shepherd, the shepherd who knows us, calls us. Calls us by name. As he called Lazarus out of the dank, dark tomb. As he called Mary Magdalene, weeping at that other, empty tomb.

The Good Shepherd does not promise to eliminate all the wiley wolves or lackadaisical shepherds, but rather to be present with the flock in the midst of these dangers. To anoint our wounds with oil. To lead us to calm places to slake our thirst. To be next to us in the darkness. The Good Shepherd does not lead the flock to the sheepfold, shut the gate, and proclaim Mission Accomplished.

The Good Shepherd accompanies the flock in the presence of enemies. In the valley of the shadow of death. Jesus the Good Shepherd calls the sheep away from the safety of the walled-off pen. And they follow.

Jesus calls us, too, to the open wilderness, just as he was led by the Spirit into the wilderness for 40 long days. Just as Moses the Shepherd was in the wilderness for 40 long years. Do you hear his voice? Can you follow?

The shepherd isn’t in the sheepfold. The shepherd is beyond its boundaries, beyond the walls, beyond a place of safety and comfort.

The Good Shepherd can be found feeding the hungry. Loving the unlovable. Giving hope to the hopeless. Touching the untouchable. Calling distracted people away from their daily tasks, saying Follow me. Bringing salvation not through the law, but through love.

Jesus calls us not only to be followers, but also to emulate the example of the Good Shepherd. And so students who have experienced and survived a school shooting raise their voices calling for safety for all students in all schools, all the time. Women who have experienced sexual harassment or discrimination band together to support each other and confront predators and seek justice. People whose lives and livelihoods are diminished or degraded by racism or classism or homophobia or other prejudice link arms, support and strengthen each other, and speak truth to power.

They do not languish in the safety of the sheepfold but have heard the voice of the Shepherd calling them into the wild pasture, reassuring them, “I know my own and my own know me.”

The Good Shepherd calls us and when we are united we can say, in the words of another poet:

He’s firmly mine by oath, I his by vow; / He’s mine by faith, and I am his by love; / He’s mine by water, I am his by wine / Thus I my Best-Beloved’s am, thus he is mine.

Amen.

Poem: “My Beloved is Mine and I am His” – Francis Quarles (1592-1644), from Love’s Redeeming Work: The Anglican Quest for Holiness compiled by Geoffrey Rowell, Kenneth Stevenson and Rowan Williams. Oxford University Press.

This Week’s Announcements, April 22-28, 2018

The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of George Briggs and in honor of St George’s Day.


If you are visiting or new  to the Advent, we hope that you will feel welcome and at home.  Please fill out a visitor’s/newcomer’s card so that we will have a record of your visit here and can keep in touch.


All persons baptized in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit are invited to the Altar to receive the Body and Blood of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. If you wish to receive a blessing, come to the Altar and cross your arms over your chest.


Childcare is provided for infants and toddlers during both the 9 am and 11:15 am Masses. 

9:00 am—Infant nursery is located on the first floor in the room beyond the Parish Office.  The Toddler nursery is located downstairs in Moseley Hall.

11:15 am—Infants and Toddlers are cared for on the first floor in the room beyond the office.

If you have questions or special needs we want to hear them.  Contact Meg Nelson 856-217-0847 or megwnelson@gmail.com.


9:00 Coffee Hour. 9:00 Coffee Hour.  Tony Pulsone & Darcy Montaldi and Barbara Boles host the Coffee Hour this morning.  Next week the hosts will be Maggie Dunbar and Eric & Melissa Baldwin. New coffee hour hosts are always needed; please contact Barbara Boles by email bbolesster@gmail.com or telephone (617-501-7572) if you’re interested or have questions about what is entailed. 

11:15 Coffee Hour.  Kyle Pilares, Kelly & Montgomery Link and Roxy Hanson host the Coffee Hour this morning.  Next week the host will be Michael Gnozzio. We are always in need of more volunteers to do the coffee hour.  To view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/.  If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Kyle Pilares (kpilares.uk@gmail.com).  


From the Wardens: Thanks to the many Adventers who have already submitted names for the Vestry to consider for the Administration and Search Committees. Please submit any further names to the Wardens (Tom Brown and Paul Roberts) or to Lynda Blair by April 30. A copy of the letter that was sent to all Parishioners may be found here.


Organ Recital, Evensong, and Supper-Lecture! This afternoon at 4:30 pm, our own Ross Wood will play the complete Symphonie Romane of Charles-Marie Widor on the Advent organ. Ross has just played this magnificent work based on Easter chants in recital at Notre-Dame in Paris, so we are surely in for a treat. At 5:00 pm, Evensong & Benediction will be sung by the Advent Choir, featuring motets of Lassus and the joyful Evening Service in D by American composer Leo Sowerby. A light supper with libation follows, and familiar friend of the parish, the Rev’d Canon Alistair Macdonald-Radcliff, will give a brief and engaging talk entitled “On Snarks and Boojums and the Quest for the Anglican Way”. Many of us recall Canon Alistair’s canny and informative Sunday evening commentary which took place last fall, concerning the situation in the Middle East. 

Evensong is a perfect way to cap off Sunday, the service is slightly less than an hour, and dinner is usually completed in the same amount of time. Please join us for all or just part of the final and very rich Sunday evening offering of the season.

 

 


COMING UP!


Spring is here, magnolia trees are blossoming and the Annual Project Bread Walk for Hunger and 5k Run is around the corner.  Thank you to those who have signed up to be Walkers with Team Advent already. Others, please consider joining Fr. Warren and many fellow Advent Parishioners on Sunday, May 6. This will be the 50th Walk for Hunger and the Church of the Advent’s 35th Walk, and most importantly, Fr. Warren’s last Walk as Rector! He has been part of this great tradition, bravely walking many miles, over these last 25 years, so, if you haven’t considered this before, please do this year!

For those interested in joining for the 5k run that starts at 7 am, please consider this too! Mark Aparece (mark.aparece@gmail.com) is the contact for this. 

Project Bread’s financial grant supports The Church of the Advent’s Tuesday Community Dinner, which is a vital part of the Advent’s community outreach program. Please consider joining us by registering as a walker or by supporting Team Advent with a donation. Our fundraising goal is $10,000.

Team Advent’s 2018 Walk for Hunger webpage

Contact Suzi Briggs : 617-905-4871 or Suzi.Briggs@gmail.com if you want to be a Walker and need help with registering.

Many thanks for your consideration and generosity on behalf of Fr. Warren and Team Advent.

The Briggs Kiernan Family,

     Bruce + Suzi

     Ellie + Emma

Team Captains 2018


First Communion Class – First Communions will be on the Feast of Pentecost, May 20, this year. Classes to prepare young people in the parish to make their First Communion will be Saturday, May 12, from 11:00 am to 11:45 am in the Rectory, and Saturday, May 19, from 11:00 am to 11:30 am in the Church. At least one parents should plan to attend the class alongside the child. 

For parents considering whether their child is ready for this step in faith development, here are some guidelines to keep in mind:  Your child must wish on their own to begin receiving Communion.  You must agree that this is appropriate, and you should feel that on some level your child understands the meaning of Holy Communion. We’re not talking Thomas Aquinas here; rather that your child, through emotion or intuition or what has been learned in the Church School, has a grasp of the meaning of the mystery of the Sacrament of the Altar.  If you or your child have any questions, please speak to the any of the clergy, who will be very happy to explain.  If you wish your child to be part of the classes, speak to Father Warren. To sign up for the class, RSVP to rector@theadventboston.org


ODDS & ENDS


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer.  You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte.  The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday.  Questions?  email:  nsheffer@newview.org


The flowers that adorn the Church are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish.  There are openings for  flower memorials or thanksgivings for the High Altar on Sunday, April 29; Thursday, May 10 (Ascension Day) – the flowers will remain for Sunday, May 13; and Thursday, May 31 (Corpus Christi) – the flowers will remain for Sunday, June 3.  If you are interested, please call Blenda Jeffry at 978-443-3519 (flowers.advent@gmail.com).


Softball, Anyone? In this season of celebrating the Resurrection, we want to see if we can breathe new life into the Advent’s softball team. Are there two persons willing to manage and coach our softball team? If you’re being called to this good work, please see Father James. The church softball league is holding its first meeting Monday, April 23, at a time and place to be announced. If we have two persons step forward to lead the team and some parishioners willing to play on the team, then we can take the field this spring and summer. Father James’ email address is frjames@theadventboston.org and his phone number is 617-523-2377 x 132.


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer.  You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte.  The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday.  Questions?  email:  nsheffer@newview.org


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
April 23-29, 2018

Monday, April 23
Michael Ramsay (& St George)

Tuesday, April 24
5:30 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, April 25
St Mark the Evangelist
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringing

Thursday, April 26
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, April 27

Saturday, April 28
10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Sunday, April 29
Fifth Sunday of Easter
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
11:15 am: Solemn Mass

Sermon Preached by Eric Fialho at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, April 15, 2018, the Third Sunday of Easter

In the name of the One true God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Amen.

And Jesus said to them, “Why are you troubled, and why do doubts arise in your hearts.”

Why are we troubled? For the past six decades or so humankind has been in the midst of an era often called, the “age of anxiety” The 1947 six-part poem by the same name by W.H. Auden sought to describe our searching for meaning in an ever-industrializing world. Some have called into question this designation, this title for the era in which we live. Perhaps we are now moving into a time, or an era of over-stimulation. What my experiences in this life have showed me so far is that many who choose to are in a time of being untethered. Of feeling disconnected. It’s now, I believe, an era of being loosed. You may ask from what, and I say that it’s an era in which we are choosing to be loosed from each other, and ultimately from God. Why do doubts arise in your hearts Jesus asked. And now I think many would encounter that same question by asking “Why are you doubtless? Why are there no doubts in your mind? Why do you not call God into question? Why do you think there’s anything else but yourself? Be a good person, sure, but what have you to do with God?

This sort of spiritual weakness or doubt or even hatred of God or whatever it is called we have all encountered it in society. Doubt is normal. Doubt is healthy. Doubt is a part of faith. But doubt when it is in the midst of our faith does not make us faithless. Being completely faithless can mean being filled with hopelessness. That feeling of being untethered.

It can mean being entombed in our own self-serving and deadened ends.

The followers of Jesus, the disciples, had doubt that was turning into such despair, into hopelessness after Jesus’ crucifixion.

They were witnesses of an altogether divine story that had happened and would never be acted out again. It was over and they didn’t quite understand the ending. They were beginning to feel utterly lost utterly hopeless without Jesus.

Envision the scene in which our Gospel reading opens.

The hour is late. The heat of the day has subsided and a slight clean chill enters under the door of the room

Some small fire is burning and casting confusing shadows about. A small gathering of people, a dozen or so, are in different places throughout the room. Some pace the floor, others speak quietly in hushed tones. still others sit in silence with expectant looks that are slowly turning into looks of sorrow.

It is an altogether bizarre sight, the darkness and overall quiet of the place conjure up images of mourning the dead, of depression, of anxiety, of fear. It is a tomb.

These followers of Christ were about to assign Jesus to death, they were about to give him up for dead… and in so doing they were ready to mourn and perhaps even rid themselves of this man who now had caused them to be overcome with grief and confusion.

As the fire casts shadows of abstract dancing shapes upon the rough walls something appears in the dark room. Something has come through the wall, or the door, or perhaps through the air! And this figure, this shape is an altogether terrifying sight.

They had gotten into their heads an idea, an image of death and hopelessness. They were buried, as it were, buried in a sort of tomb. In a sort of tomb they had walled themselves inside of, and this sort of tomb, this sort of mindset is focused only on the possibilities that present themselves in that walled in space. In only the supposed reality of what they can reach for in front of them.

By their own wills they had begun to shut out the endless possibilities that Jesus brings to humankind.

They shut out the notion that anything good could actually enter into the room, it had to instead have been a ghost.

Something untoward, something unnatural, something that caused terror.

The possibility that the Christ had come to them was so distant a thought in their heads that they actually could not bring themselves to recognize their Lord, to recognize our Lord.

Jesus then says to them, “why are you frightened, and why do doubts arise in your hearts?

Now why is it they do not recognize the resurrected Jesus?

While we cannot rule out that after the Resurrection Jesus was in someway changed and altered in appearance the scriptures may be eluding to and pointing at another possibility, the possibility that the many people who did not recognize Jesus after the resurrection,  were not able to because of their unwillingness to do so, because of their doubts, and because their hearts were so stopped that they could not allow for the possibility that Jesus Christ was with them.  

We can be brought to do this as well.

There are those times in our lives when we are unable to bring ourselves to a place where the good, where the holy, where love is able to enter in. It is unable to enter in because we have not lifted our gazes out from the tomb. Out from the negative places where we are sometimes or even often want to go and to stay.

How common it is for us to fail to recognize the risen Christ in front of our eyes. It is prevalent in our world. In fact it is rampant. We fail to recognize Christ and ultimately to recognize just how undone we are, just how untethered we have allowed ourselves to become.

Our eyes, ears, and hearts can become stopped. A sort of blindness that effects more then just our eyes creeps into us, and we are left with figuring out a world that cannot be figured out without the help of Christ. We shuffle around or pace or huddle up like the disciples in that dark shadowy room and whether we understand it or now we are only greeted in this dimmed vision by silence and ultimately by bottomless, bottomless despair.

Why don’t we see Jesus?

Why do we allow ourselves to be kept from fully giving ourselves over to expecting him?

And I don’t mean expecting him and seeing him in every person you look at, or every beautiful wonder of nature you see, or even through every thought you think, but I mean honestly with your heart and whole existence lift up yourself to the possibility that Christ wants you to see him.  

He doesn’t want you to evade him, or put him off, or assign him to one day a week. Christ delights in those times when he doesn’t have to say “be not afraid” he delights. He delights in this because he knows that you are as quick to recognize him and embrace him as he is quick to love you.

What Christ is doing in Luke here for his disciples is teaching them what their faith should look like. He is imparting divine wisdom upon them. He must teach of this new faith, a faith in the Son of God, for there was no precedent.

There was no rubric that they could follow! There was no such faith before.   A cosmic event had occurred, and Jesus knew that he had to establish the new faith in that dark room and in that time to those women and men who were on the edge of hopelessness. But instead of bottomless despair Christ introduced to them the continued truth of this great story.

He was able to do this because they recognized him. They recognized him and took him in. They realized that in that place. They were able to be reigned in from their wandering, from their being loosed from the possibilities that can only come from God.

So then let us not stay locked inside of our rooms which cast confusing shadows upon the walls. These rooms which do not allow the endless possibilities of Christ to enter in.

Instead let us lift ourselves up to the possibility that Christ wants us to recognize him. Christ wants us to recognize him.

Amen.

Collect for the Third Sunday of Easter

O God, whose blessed Son did manifest himself to his disciples in the breaking of bread: Open, we pray thee, the eyes of our faith, that we may behold him in all his redeeming work; through the same thy Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

This Week’s Announcements, April 15-21, 2018

If you are visiting or new  to the Advent, we hope that you will feel welcome and at home.  Please fill out a visitor’s/newcomer’s card so that we will have a record of your visit here and can keep in touch.


All persons baptized in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit are invited to the Altar to receive the Body and Blood of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. If you wish to receive a blessing, come to the Altar and cross your arms over your chest.


Childcare is provided for infants and toddlers during both the 9 am and 11:15 am Masses. 

9:00 am—Infant nursery is located on the first floor in the room beyond the Parish Office.  The Toddler nursery is located downstairs in Moseley Hall.

11:15 am—Infants and Toddlers are cared for on the first floor in the room beyond the office.

If you have questions or special needs we want to hear them.  Contact Meg Nelson 856-217-0847 or megwnelson@gmail.com.


9:00 Coffee Hour. 9:00 Coffee Hour.  Betsy Ridge Madsen and Will Joyner & Linda Jones host the Coffee Hour this morning.  Next week the hosts will be Tony Pulsone & Darcy Montaldi and Barbara Boles. New coffee hour hosts are always needed; please contact Barbara Boles by email bbolesster@gmail.com or telephone (617-501-7572) if you’re interested or have questions about what is entailed. 

11:15 Coffee Hour.  Persis Dhas, Mark Davidson, Kara Rodgers and Philip Marshall host the Coffee Hour this morning.  Next week the host will be Kyle Pilares. We are always in need of more volunteers to do the coffee hour.  To view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/.  If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Kyle Pilares (kpilares.uk@gmail.com).  


THIS WEEK!


Monday, April 16, is Patriots’ Day and the Parish Office will be closed. The regular schedule will be observed: Morning Prayer at 9:00 am; Low Mass at 12:15 pm; Evening Prayer at 5:30 pm.


Theology on Tap Returns this Tuesday, April 17!

Historian and memoirist Carlos M. N. Eire opens the 2018 season of Theology on Tap with reflections on: “Transforming the Supernatural in the Reformation”.

One of the most significant changes brought about by the Protestant Reformation was a redefinition of the relation between the natural and supernatural realms, which amounted to a redefinition of religion itself. How did this redefinition shape the various churches created in this era? How did it affect the Church of England? How does it affect us today?

Prof. Eire is the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of History and Religious Studies at Yale University and the author of numerous books, including most recently the magisterial Reformations: The Early Modern World, which won the R. R. Hawkins Prize for Best Book of the Year from the American Publishers Association, as well as the award for Best Book in the Humanities. He is also the author of the best-selling memoir Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy, which won the National Book Award for Non-Fiction.

Join us at 7 pm on April 17 at: Carrie Nation Cocktail Club, The Beacon Room, 11 Beacon Street, near the State House.

Parishioners wishing to eat dinner first are strongly encouraged to arrive early and please inform the club that you are part of the Church of the Advent party for the evening.


COMING UP!


Organ Recital, Evensong, and Supper-Lecture! Next Sunday, April 22, at 4:30 pm, our own Ross Wood will play the complete Symphonie Romane of Charles-Marie Widor on the Advent organ. Ross has just played this magnificent work based on Easter chants in recital at Notre-Dame in Paris, so we are surely in for a treat. At 5:00 pm, Evensong & Benediction will be sung by the Advent Choir, featuring motets of Lassus and the joyful Evening Service in D by American composer Leo Sowerby. A light supper with libation follows, and familiar friend of the parish, the Rev’d Canon Alistair Macdonald-Radcliff, will give a brief and engaging talk on the nature of Anglicanism. Many of us recall Canon Alistair’s canny and informative Sunday evening commentary which took place last fall, concerning the situation in the Middle East. 

Evensong is a perfect way to cap off Sunday, the service is slightly less than an hour, and dinner is usually completed in the same amount of time. Please join us for all or just part of the final and very rich Sunday evening offering of the season.


First Communion Class – First Communions will be on the Feast of Pentecost, May 20, this year. Classes to prepare young people in the parish to make their First Communion will be Saturday, May 12, from 11:00 am to 11:45 am in the Rectory, and Saturday, May 19, from 11:00 am to 11:30 am in the Church. At least one parents should plan to attend the class alongside the child. 

For parents considering whether their child is ready for this step in faith development, here are some guidelines to keep in mind:  Your child must wish on their own to begin receiving Communion.  You must agree that this is appropriate, and you should feel that on some level your child understands the meaning of Holy Communion. We’re not talking Thomas Aquinas here; rather that your child, through emotion or intuition or what has been learned in the Church School, has a grasp of the meaning of the mystery of the Sacrament of the Altar.  If you or your child have any questions, please speak to the any of the clergy, who will be very happy to explain.  If you wish your child to be part of the classes, speak to Father Warren. To sign up for the class, RSVP to rector@theadventboston.org

 


Glorious Easter is still in our minds and Spring is almost here, which means that the Annual Project Bread Walk for Hunger is beckoning!!  

Please consider joining Fr. Warren and many fellow Advent Parishioners on Sunday, May 6th. This will be the 50th Walk for Hunger and at least the 35th Church of the Advent participation in the Walk, and most importantly, Fr. Warren’s last Walk! He has been part of this great tradition, bravely walking many miles, over these last 25 years, so, if you haven’t considered this before, please do this year!

For those interested in joining for the 5k run that starts at 7 am, please consider this too! Mark Aparece (mark.aparece@gmail.com) will be a contact for this. 

Project Bread’s financial grant supports The Church of the Advent’s Tuesday Community Dinner, which is a vital part of the Advent’s community outreach program.

Please consider joining us by registering as a walker or by supporting Team Advent with a donation. Our fundraising goal is $10,000.

Team Advent’s 2018 Walk for Hunger webpage

Contact Suzi Briggs : 617-905-4871 or Suzi.Briggs@gmail.com if you want to be a Walker and need help with registering.

Many thanks for your consideration and generosity on behalf of Fr. Warren and Team Advent.

The Briggs Kiernan Family,

     Bruce + Suzi

     Ellie + Emma

Team Captains 2018


ODDS & ENDS


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer.  You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte.  The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday.  Questions?  email:  nsheffer@newview.org


The flowers that adorn the Church are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish.  There are openings for  flower memorials or thanksgivings for the High Altar on Sundays, April 22 and 29; Thursday, May 10 (Ascension Day) – the flowers will remain for Sunday, May 13; and Thursday, May 31 (Corpus Christi) – the flowers will remain for Sunday, June 3.  If you are interested, please call Blenda Jeffry at 978-443-3519 (flowers.advent@gmail.com).


Softball, Anyone? In this season of celebrating the Resurrection, we want to see if we can breathe new life into the Advent’s softball team. Are there two persons willing to manage and coach our softball team? If you’re being called to this good work, please see Father James. The church softball league is holding its first meeting Monday, April 23, at a time and place to be announced. If we have two persons step forward to lead the team and some parishioners willing to play on the team, then we can take the field this spring and summer. Father James’ email address is frjames@theadventboston.org and his phone number is 617-523-2377 x 132.


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer.  You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte.  The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday.  Questions?  email:  nsheffer@newview.org


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
April 16-22, 2018

Monday, April 16
Patriots Day (Parish Office Closed)

Tuesday, April 17
5:30 pm: Community Supper
7:00 pm: Theology on Tap

Wednesday, April 18
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Bellringing

Thursday, April 19
Alphege of Canterbury
5:15 pm: Property Committee
6:15 pm: Vestry
7:00 pm: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Friday, April 20

Saturday, April 21
Anselm of Canterbury
10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Sunday, April 22
Fourthay of Easter
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
11:15 am: Solemn Mass
4:30 pm: Organ Recital
5:00 pm: Solemn Evensong & Benediction; Lecture

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Allan B. Warren III at the Church of the Advent, Sunday, April 8, 2018, the Second Sunday of Easter

Alleluia !  Alleluia !  Alleluia !

It is a very odd and wonderful word – Alleluia.  I wonder how many people here this morning know what it means.  Some of you, certainly. But I suspect that those of you who don’t know are probably in the majority.  Indeed, I would to wager that hundreds of thousands, even millions of Christians over the centuries have used this word and rejoiced in this word without having any idea at all what they were saying.

What is does mean is this:  Praise God !  But how much better is:  Alleluia !  There is something joyful just in the sound of the word.  Alleluia!  What an excellent and strange word.  It is a shout !  An acclamation !  A cry of triumph and joy, praise and thanksgiving !  A cry even of surprise !

And that is as it should be, for in this holy season we celebrate something which surprised and continues to surprise the whole world:  that Jesus, the rabbi of Nazareth, through the power of God, has risen from the dead and, by his death and rising has defeated everything which led him to the Cross and held humankind in bondage.

And it was a surprise, you know, for they didn’t expect it.  Even those who had lived with him and were closest to him and listened to him as he taught.  They didn’t expect it at all.  They went to the tomb ( we heard the story last Sunday ), Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to mourn ( their teacher, their master was dead ), but they found that the stone had been rolled back from the entrance to the tomb, and what could they imagine but that his body had been stolen away.  A desecration of his grave.  Another act of cruelty and hatred toward the one who had been so cruelly tortured and killed.  What else could it be ? 

But then they learned that he had risen and was “going before you to Galilee.”  They didn’t expect it and they were surprised.  Alleluia !

And today, we heard the story of Thomas.  Not only did Thomas not expect it, he refused to believe it.  “Unless I see in his hands the print of the print of the nails, and place my finger in the mark of the nails, and place my hand in his side, I will not believe.”  But Thomas was surprised.  Alleluia !  Jesus appeared to him, and Thomas exclaimed, “My Lord and my God !”  Alleluia !

And for so many reasons we don’t expect it either, do we ?  Human life and the world around us so often seems caught in a grip of grim fatality, destined to repeat again and gain the same boring sins and stupid mistakes, condemned to endure the same disappointments and sadnesses.  Good Friday seems the last word on the world and the lives we live.  Hopes dashed to pieces, goodness crushed.  Expect nothing and you’ll never be disappointed.  That’s what a great aunt of mine used to say, and most of us agree with her.  Expect nothing and you’ll never be disappointed.

And so, we too are surprised; for the last word, you see, is God’s word not ours, and not the world’s.  And Good Friday is not what it seemed to be, for in Easter tide we learn that that seemingly awful day was really a triumph.  Love won the battle of the Cross.  Obedience and faithfulness prevailed, even in the midst of evil and hatred and pain – and the Christ, our dear Lord Jesus, is proclaimed by God victorious.  He lives !  The tomb cannot contain him.  Love is larger than sin and death.  In this sad old world, one hears a new shout:  Alleluia !  The weeping and the tears are ended.  Alleluia !  He is risen.  Alleluia!

And this is what it is: a shout !  An acclamation !  The proclamation of a victory ! 

There are no proofs and it can’t be proven.  But those who know the love and the power of the risen Jesus need no proofs.  There are no explanations, and it can’t be explained.  Jesus is risen from the dead.  It is a new fact about the world and about human life which goes beyond all the old fatalities, and itself creates a new world.  It is unexpected.  A reversal of what we thought we knew.  A complete surprise.  Alleluia!

And so, my sisters and brothers, let us not look for proofs in Easter tide.  Jesus is risen from the dead; his victory proves itself.  And let us not try to explain.  God acted in Jesus, and his love is its own explanation. 

If we boast, let our boast be of God. 

If we weep, let our tears be tears of joy. 

And if we shout let our shout be that ancient and always new cry which overcomes the world.  Praise God !  Alleluia!  Alleluia !  Alleluia !

Collect for the Second Sunday of Easter

Almighty and everlasting God, who in the Paschal mystery hast established the new covenant of reconciliation: Grant that all who have been reborn into the fellowship of Christ’s Body may show forth in their lives what they profess by their faith; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

This Week’s Announcements, April 8-14, 2018

 

The flowers at the High Altar are given to the Glory of God and in loving Memory and Thanksgiving for the life of William S. Joyner.


If you are visiting or new  to the Advent, we hope that you will feel welcome and at home.  Please fill out a visitor’s/newcomer’s card so that we will have a record of your visit here and can keep in touch.


All persons baptized in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit are invited to the Altar to receive the Body and Blood of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. If you wish to receive a blessing, come to the Altar and cross your arms over your chest.


Childcare is provided for infants and toddlers during both the 9 am and 11:15 am Masses. 

9:00 am—Infant nursery is located on the first floor in the room beyond the Parish Office.  The Toddler nursery is located downstairs in Moseley Hall.

11:15 am—Infants and Toddlers are cared for on the first floor in the room beyond the office.

If you have questions or special needs we want to hear them.  Contact Meg Nelson 856-217-0847 or megwnelson@gmail.com.


9:00 Coffee Hour. 9:00 Coffee Hour.  Rachel & Rob Braman and Carolyn & Tom McDermott host the Coffee Hour this morning.  Next week the hosts will be Betsy Ridge Madsen and Will Joyner & Linda Jones. New coffee hour hosts are always needed; please contact Barbara Boles by email bbolesster@gmail.com or telephone (617-501-7572) if you’re interested or have questions about what is entailed. 

11:15 Coffee Hour.  Marie & Jean Rateau, Karen Harrington, Kyriel Paleologue and Alfred Duhamel host the Coffee Hour this morning.  We are always in need of more volunteers to do the coffee hour.  To view the schedule of available dates and select a date to co-host, please go to http://theadventboston.org/1115-coffee-hour-signup/.  If you have any questions, please contact Frederick Ou (frederick.ou@gmail.com), Roxy Hanson (roxenewu@yahoo.com) or Kyle Pilares (kpilares.uk@gmail.com).  

Thank you to everyone who contributed something for Easter Day’s 11:15 a.m. Coffee Hour and making it a success. May God bless you all for your generosity and helping to make the Advent a convivial place on this highest of feast days, especially for our guests and visitors!

Soli Deo gloria,

Frederick, Kyle, and Roxy


Compline at the Advent—Tonight at 8:00 pm, join us for the ancient liturgy of Compline, preceded by Lucernarium, an evening service of lamp-lighting.  We pray Compline on the second Sunday of every month at 8:00 pm in the nave. 


THIS WEEK!


Dear Younger Adventers!  The Twenty-and-Thirty-Somethings’ Group is gathering again after its successful resurrection two months ago!  Please come to the Healing Mass on the April 11, Wednesday, at 6 pm and stay afterwards for drinks and pizza.  For more information, contact Kyriell Palaeologue at 617-396-6225 (k.oldword@gmail.com).


COMING UP!


Theology on Tap Returns on April 17!

Historian and memoirist Carlos M. N. Eire opens the 2018 season of Theology on Tap with reflections on: “Transforming the Supernatural in the Reformation”.

One of the most significant changes brought about by the Protestant Reformation was a redefinition of the relation between the natural and supernatural realms, which amounted to a redefinition of religion itself. How did this redefinition shape the various churches created in this era? How did it affect the Church of England? How does it affect us today?

Prof. Eire is the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of History and Religious Studies at Yale University and the author of numerous books, including most recently the magisterial Reformations: The Early Modern World, which won the R. R. Hawkins Prize for Best Book of the Year from the American Publishers Association, as well as the award for Best Book in the Humanities. He is also the author of the best-selling memoir Waiting for Snow in Havana: Confessions of a Cuban Boy, which won the National Book Award for Non-Fiction.

Join us at 7 pm on April 17 at: Carrie Nation Cocktail Club, The Beacon Room, 11 Beacon Street, near the State House.

Parishioners wishing to eat dinner first are strongly encouraged to arrive early and please inform the club that you are part of the Church of the Advent party for the evening.


Glorious Easter is still in our minds and Spring is almost here, which means that the Annual Project Bread Walk for Hunger is beckoning!!  

Please consider joining Fr. Warren and many fellow Advent Parishioners on Sunday, May 6th. This will be the 50th Walk for Hunger and at least the 35th Church of the Advent participation in the Walk, and most importantly, Fr. Warren’s last Walk! He has been part of this great tradition, bravely walking many miles, over these last 25 years, so, if you haven’t considered this before, please do this year!

Project Bread’s financial grant supports The Church of the Advent’s Tuesday Community Dinner, which is a vital part of the Advent’s community outreach program.

Please consider joining us by registering as a walker or by supporting Team Advent with a donation. Our fundraising goal is $10,000.

Team Advent’s 2018 Walk for Hunger webpage

Contact Suzi Briggs : 617-905-4871 or Suzi.Briggs@gmail.com if you want to be a Walker and need help with registering.

Many thanks for your consideration and generosity on behalf of Fr. Warren and Team Advent.

The Briggs Kiernan Family,

     Bruce + Suzi

     Ellie + Emma

Team Captains 2018


ODDS & ENDS


Discount Vouchers for the Boston Common Garage are available for $9.00 each from Deacon Daphne or Nola Sheffer.  You can find them between the 9:00 and 11:15 Masses at the Coffee Hour or Entr’acte.  The vouchers can be used after 4:00 pm weekdays, and all day Saturday and Sunday.  Questions?  email:  nsheffer@newview.org


The flowers that adorn the Church are funded entirely by donations from members and friends of the Parish.  There are openings for  flower memorials or thanksgivings for the High Altar on Sundays, April 15, 22 and 29.  If you are interested, please call Blenda Jeffry at 978-443-3519 (flowers.advent@gmail.com).


THIS WEEK AT THE ADVENT
April 9-15, 2018

Monday, April 9
Dietrich Bonhoeffer
8:30 am: Advent School Share Event
6:00 pm: AGO Chapter Meeting

Tuesday, April 10
William Law
5:30 pm: Community Supper

Wednesday, April 11
George Augustus Selwyn
10:00 am: Bible Study
6:00 pm: Healing Mass
7:00 pm: Advent 20s and 30s Gathering
7:00 pm: Bellringing

Thursday, April 12

Friday, April 13

Saturday, April 14
10:00 am: Advent Choir Rehearsal

Sunday, April 15
Third Sunday of Easter
8:00 am: Low Mass
9:00 am: Sung Mass
11:15 am: Solemn Mass

Sermon Preached by the Rev’d Dr Arnold Klukas at the Church of the Advent, Easter Day, April 1, 2018

There are actually three kinds of people who travel. There are wanderers, there are tourists, and there are pilgrims.

  • Wanderers can’t stay still because they can’t stand themselves, and so constantly wander, thinking that someplace else will be better – it doesn’t matter where; just keep going.
  • Tourists like to be interested in things, but don’t like to get involved. Much better to stay at the Hilton than to deal with the natives.
  • And then there are pilgrims. Pilgrims can take all shapes and sizes, but they all have one thing in common: they know where they’re going. They have a purpose. They have an intention.

And one of the most important things about the whole Hebrew/Christian tradition is that, unlike much of the ancient world, the Asian world, and the classical world, we are not wanderers. We are not involved in a cyclical cycle that repeats itself with no intention. We are in a world that has a beginning, a middle, and an end. We are now in the middle, but it was begun because God loved the world into being. It will end because God wants it to be sufficient unto Himself, and complete. And we as pilgrims in the meanwhile move from that time of creation to the time of fruition, but we know where we’re going. That’s very important, and all of Holy Week we have been on that pilgrimage, walking alongside our Lord as he trod the Via Dolorosa, endured the Cross, and was buried in a borrowed tomb.

Today’s Gospel is actually my least favorite of the four resurrection stories, because it doesn’t give all of the wonderful bits and pieces about the angels coming, and the stone being rolled away with thunder and all sorts of things. It ends with the three Marys, who after all had come to give reverence to a dead body, being fearful and afraid. It had been a wonderful thing to see the empty tomb; but the empty tomb isn’t the point. The empty tomb is only half of it. The empty tomb is an empty tomb because of the Risen Lord. His body was not there, because it had been resurrected. And it’s very important for us to know as Christians two things: Jesus’ resurrection was a bodily resurrection; and he has promised that we too in Christ shall know our own bodily resurrection. We’re not going to be spirits somewhere in the way-out-there, floating around with nothing in particular to do; we are going to be resurrected in a new life that is consistent with our old life, in the sense that that which makes us who we are is retained, so that we will know face to face those whom we’ve loved in the past, even as we see Our Lord face to face as well. So let’s look first of all at the issue of Our Lord’s body, and then talk about our bodies.

The important thing about Jesus’ body is better explained in a poem by the American poet John Updike. Cynics among you might think, “Oh, what a depressing man.” He was actually a committed Episcopalian and a very devout Christian, and one of the poems that made a splash because it was so terribly un-contemporary was his poem called “Seven Stanzas at Easter.”

Make no mistake: if he rose at all
It was as His body;
If the cell’s dissolution did not reverse, the molecule reknit,
The amino acids rekindle,
The Church will fall.

It was not as the flowers,
Each soft spring recurrent;
It was not as His Spirit in the mouths and fuddled eyes of the
Eleven apostles;
It was as His flesh; ours.

The same hinged thumbs and toes
The same valved heart
That—pierced—died, withered, paused, and then regathered
Out of enduring Might
New strength to enclose.

Let us not mock God with metaphor,
Analogy, sidestepping, transcendence,
Making of the event a parable, a sign painted in the faded
Credulity of earlier ages:
Let us walk through the door.

The stone is rolled back, not papier-mache,
Not a stone in a story,
But the vast rock of materiality that in the slow grinding of
Time will eclipse for each of us
The wide light of day.

And if we have an angel at the tomb,
Make it a real angel,
Weighty with Max Planck’s quanta, vivid with hair, opaque in
The dawn light, robed in real linen
Spun on a definite loom.

Let us not seek to make it less monstrous,
For our own convenience, our own sense of beauty,
Lest, awakened in one unthinkable hour, we are embarrassed
By the miracle,
And crushed by remonstrance.

 If our Lord has not raised bodily from the dead, as St Paul says, then our faith is in vain. One of the problems that has passed with many people in terms of the Resurrection is that many of you grew up in a Newtonian world, a world where Deism and those who liked Deism reigned, and where reality had to be physical, and there was a separation between matter and energy. They were different. But we now live in an increasingly post-Newtonian age, where physicists (I have a son who is a particle physicist) talk about the fact that the cosmos is an incredibly intertwined mystery, where we don’t have easy answers, where matter becomes energy, energy becomes matter, where time is transferable, time is changeable, time is relative. And so consequently, all of the stabilities of a modernist age are now in disarray. Why not have the body of Our Lord transformed? Why not matter into energy?

St Anselm, the great philosopher-theologian, said, “I believe in order that I might understand.” He didn’t say, “I create my understanding to what I want to believe,” but “I believe in order that I might understand.” We as Christians today are facing many people who have varying theologies, who think that we have to be relevant to the age. Those who say that are actually already themselves antiques, because they’re talking about being relevant to the former age. Newton is dead; his apple is rotten; and people like him in the grave may have a great surprise at the end of time.

Jesus rose from the dead because he wants us to be a part of him, and as I said last night, one of the beautiful things in the Mass that normally is not perceived by the congregation is that as the wine and the water are prepared for Mass, the priest says a prayer, as he mixes the water and wine, and says, “By this mingling of water and wine, may we participate in Christ’s divinity, who partook of our humanity.” Remember the water and the blood that flew out of Christ’s side at the Crucifixion. The imagery there is that, because Jesus took on our nature – our physical nature – we of all creation are unique, and that we now have been divinized through Christ even as he has humanized God in our relationship. We are a part, we are brothers and sisters, of the Godhead. It doesn’t mean we are divine; and indeed one of the great dangers of a lot modern “spiritual but not religious” is that self-actualization is equatable with spirituality. Self-actualization is impossible, because you cannot be actualized except in relationship. A child brought up, as we know, terribly, from experiences in the Eastern bloc countries where infants who were orphans were raised physically but never nurtured, and in the end result was that they had no relational ability. They were smothered and small.

CS Lewis in The Great Divorce, a wonderful novel, talks about a human being given the privilege, like Dante’s figure in the Divine Comedy, where he goes to both Heaven and Hell. In Hell he finds people getting smaller and smaller and smaller, because they feed on themselves. They have nothing else. They’re given the chance of going to Heaven, but they refuse. Each has an excuse. My favorite is a bishop (I think I know who it is, exactly) who is a great debater and much prefers the uncertainty of Hell, where he can debate the possibilities, than having to face the reality of Heaven. And when that same human person goes to Heaven, he finds everything bigger and more real than it was in his human experience, and he realizes that the transformation in the Resurrection doesn’t mean, mercifully, that you’re going to need some kind of skin care after you’re resurrected. The “is-ness” of our resurrection is not about the fact that we look exactly as we did, but that which makes us who we are continues.

So much of Eastern spirituality talks about us being merged into the great ooze of being. Well, I’ve never liked ooze, nor do I find it very relational. Squishy, yes, but not relational. And so consequently, it’s important for us to recognize that what Jesus is talking about in his own resurrection is a life transformed and made fuller and richer and more real than even the life as we know it now. That has implications for us as well. When I have a really difficult point to make I always quote somebody bigger than I am. N.T. Wright, former Bishop of Durham, has a wonderful thing to say. He says, “The continuing message of the resurrection of Jesus is precisely not that there is life after death. There is of course life after death, and all God’s people will inherit it, but the point is that it won’t be what most modern Westerners think, as if life after death was a mere continuation. It will involve God’s people being given new bodies, like Jesus’ body, to share in the new heavens and the new earth that God will make.”

Every time we say the Creed, we say, ‘And we believe in the resurrection of the body and the life everlasting.’ Now, what does that imply? I think there are four things we as Christians need to rejoice in about the resurrection of the body of our Lord and the fact that we have the hope of resurrection of ourselves.

The first is that Jesus’ resurrection is a foretaste of our own. We will have a continuity with our past lives, but washed and enlarged. And our life won’t be static. Think of the three virtues – “Faith, hope, and love, these three; but the greatest is love.” Why is love the greatest? Because when we come into fullness of life in Heaven, we won’t hope; we will know. We will no longer have faith, for we will have sight. The one thing we will have, the one thing that continues and grows in us, is love. So that the love which Christ gives us – and indeed, for a Christian, love is not something we possess; love is something for which we are a channel; God’s love abundantly flows through us out to the world, if we but let it.  And by means of the Sacraments, by means of hearing the Word, by means of prayer, by means of coming together and sharing with each other, we activate that love, which then flows through us out into the world and establishes a greater part of God’s kingdom. So, we will be whole and complete, and we will know and love and be loved in ways we never could have anticipated.

Secondly, Jesus’ resurrection empowers us to experience new life right now. God the Father fully reigns in Heaven, as we say every time we say the Lord’s Prayer, but his dominion on earth is not yet complete. By these words and sacraments and our actions, we continue and extend that reign of God. He works in us and through us to extend his will. As St Teresa of Avila once said, “God can work without us, but He wills to work with us, because He wants us to cooperate in this dominion of love.”

Thirdly, Jesus’ resurrection demands that we see a wider vision of the cosmos, and the limitations of our own understanding. We are part of a greater reality than we can see, that transcends our own limitations. One of the things that many of us forget in the West is that we talk in the Creed about, “He descended to the dead”, or “He descended into Hell.” Many people in the 18th century got rid of that, because it was too downbeat. You probably know that the person who became the Minister at King’s Chapel told people that he’d love to be their minister as long as they got rid of all that stuff about the Trinity, because it didn’t make any sense. But that’s again a misunderstanding of dogma and true doctrine. What happens is that we are a part of a huge, very deeply interconnected experience, and all of that is tied together in love. One of the ways Paul talks about the importance of Jesus is that he says – and this is a mis-translation of the Greek – “Jesus is the glue that holds the whole world together.” It’s the divine energy of love that created the world; it is the divine energy of God’s love that maintains the world, and we only see a small portion of that.

Finally, we will rise with our bodies, not as dismembered spirits, and we will meet and greet all those whom we have loved in the past, and get to greet all those people we’ve wanted to but never could. Can’t wait to talk to Anselm, myself. Revelation, the great Apocalypse, describes a new heaven and the new Jerusalem coming down from heaven to earth; a new and renewed physical world. Jesus calls us into that reality now that will continue forever.

I want to leave you with one Yankee thing. Every time you walk through a graveyard, especially in those graveyards that were established before the 18th century, notice the fact that the tombstones are all at the west side, because the body was always laid with the head toward the tombstone. Why? Because from the early Middle Ages on people understood that when Jesus came back, he came back from the east, with the rising sun, and so everyone wished to be buried so that as they were resurrected, and they came up out of their tombs, they would see Him face to face.

The joy of Easter is ours. Let us rejoice and be glad, and as we come to what I call the “Anglican altar call”, and receive our Lord’s presence in His Body and Blood, let us know that this is a foretaste of the feast to come. Amen.